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Because We Need To Talk About It

  1. watchdaddy1 Dec 31, 2016

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    WOW great post .Here's to a healthy balance & more good days then bad.
    Thanks for sharing your insight.
    Respects
    William
     
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  2. X350 XJR Vintage Omega Aficionado Jan 1, 2017

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    I just wanted to thank everyone who read this post and especially to those who posted comments or PMed me.

    All the best to everyone in the New Year.


    Norman -
     
  3. TNTwatch Jan 1, 2017

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    May the new year bring the best for you.

    Been wondering why you were so quiet for the last year or so. Your posts are always among the most enjoyable to me on the forums, however long or short they are.
     
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  4. ahartfie The black sheep in the Spee-ee-eee-eedmaster flock Jan 3, 2017

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    I bought five copies of this book to support the author. I'd read excerpts as he was publishing it and it just seemed so right and spot-on to me. It's The No Bullshit Guide to Depression by Stephen Skoczen. You can read about it here. I myself have not read it yet.

    Norman, if you would like a copy, PM me your mailing info and I'll send you one.

    Two other people, if you want one, the same deal applies - PM me.

    --Adam

    IMG_3219.JPG
     
  5. SpeedyAV Jan 4, 2017

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    Awesome gesture @ahartfie :thumbsup:
     
  6. slique12 Mar 31, 2017

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    Love this!
     
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  7. ahartfie The black sheep in the Spee-ee-eee-eedmaster flock Mar 31, 2017

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    I just mailed out my last copy last week to one of my unmet Facebook friends. I hope they've all helped their readers.
     
  8. michael22 Mar 31, 2017

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    Well done X350 & ahartfie.

    I have had various trials with mentally ill family members. It is an ongoing issue.
    A few years ago I volunteered for a small charity, that does a lot of good things for the mentally ill. It was started in response to a spike in the suicide rate in this region. I am now a board member, & mental illness seems a bigger part of society than ever. It is an illness, not a character flaw. The sooner we all can talk about it openly, the better it will be for everyone.
     
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  9. Perseus May 30, 2017

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    Terrific post! My family has a history of depression and bi-polar. Many people feel ashamed talking about it and I hope that stigma goes away soon.
     
  10. Amadeus May 30, 2017

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    Espero sepas disculpar, que te escriba en español que es mi lengua, mi ingles es muy pobre, y este mensaje es muy importante para cometer errores.
    La medicacion psiquiatrica es muy importante y no hay que abandonarla, pero si fuiste medicado por muchos años y no obtuviste resultados favorables, señal de que no es el camino necesario, decia un artista argentino para los deprimidos "estas distraido, no deprimido". te recomiendo que hagas Yoga o cualquier disciplina que te haga sentir lo que verdaderamente queres de la vida. y hacelo sin imortarte nada de nadie o de nada en el mundo y de ultima opcion vende todo lo que tengas y aqnda por el mundo, o presentate a un hospital de niños y pedi ser volunataqrio, te aseguro que en una semanaa se te pasa la depresion.
    Espero te sirvan estas sugerencias, y recorda lo del yoga, chi kung, o cualquier otra disciplina que te conecte con tuss verdaderos deseos, espero puedas hacer traducir correctamente esto y siempre que quieras estoy dispuesto a escucharte. saludos Amadeus

    <Edit by dsio, just adding an English google translation for people who may want to read it>
    -------------------------------------------
     
    Edited by a mod May 30, 2017
  11. michael22 May 30, 2017

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    Yes, an interest in something, & regular exercise, are well recognised neccesities for a healthy mind & body.

    On Monday I attended this workshop: http://suicideaware.info/index.php/education-training/suicide-prevention-lifeforce\

    It was very good, suitable for people with or without formal training, & free. I believe it is Australia wide.
    Phone 1800 100 024
     
    Edited May 30, 2017
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  12. dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member May 30, 2017

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    @Amadeus I hope you don't mind, I just edited your post to add a google translation below it, which probably isn't greatly accurate but I think gets most of what you are saying across.
     
  13. Amadeus May 30, 2017

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    Thankful
     
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  14. akshayluc420 May 31, 2017

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    Hi Amadeus, I find your post really interesting, especially since I've actually implemented the suggestions for the exact opposite reason.

    Long story short, after about 10 years on various types of medications, weight gain and loss, difficult conversation with colleagues, bosses and the rare partner, I decided with the help of my therapist at the time to ween of it. I've been medication free for the last 4 years and have been coping by one principle: keep yourself so busy and distracted that I don't have the energy to be consumed by the lows, even though it still persists, ready to drag me under. I won't lie, this involves a lot of effort and willful ignorance to focus on these distractions, but it affords me more control over myself and more importantly, the facade.

    This is a sticky subject, I've lost a few friends I've confided in because they feel that the facade is deceitful, and I can appreciate their point of view. The alternative, being completely myself, is much harsher; and I fear not being an accepted, functioning member of society. Depression is a condition, and stop-gaps are exactly that, stop-gaps; the tiniest bit of joy or sense of achievement is quickly drowned out. That's why I guess distractions have helped me. CBT has also helped a bit, though any therapy is contingent upon what causes the depression. Remember that we have to keep at it, it's tough and we fail at times, but we must keep at it.

    Thank you Norman for starting this thread, and everyone that has shared, just knowing there are others helps Especially when we share a common passion!

    Edit: Thanks also to Dsio for the translation, sorry I missed out earlier ::shy::
     
    Edited May 31, 2017
  15. WatchArt Jun 2, 2017

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    Thank you for sharing. I think it's also good to know that there are lots of ongoing research studies (mostly pharmaceutical) examining the causes of depression and ways to help. It is an ailment (like you mentioned heart disease). . . brain neurotransmitters and interactions affect mood and reactions. Pharmaceutical companies are working hard with researchers and novel means of studying have been designed (functional MRI testing). . also using smartphones and the internet there are new methods of spreading awareness and counseling (imagine a teen with suicidal ideation having instant access to live chat support). There are more and more support groups and movements towards change. I think everyone appreciates you opening up and sharing and is behind you. Your message will only be amplified by the forum members. For some more info on studies/research a reasonable place to start (without commericial bias) https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml. Best wishes.
     
  16. mollydooker Jun 6, 2017

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    Oh my goodness my thoughts and best wishes go out to you.
    Churchill coined the expression "black dog" for depression but I reckon he was doing black dogs a disservice.
    I have a daughter with this and her highs/ lows and disappointments when medications don't work are truly heartbreaking .
    I am an alcoholic but all I had to do was not pick up a drink ( been 35 years)
    I had prostate cancer but all I had to do was have my prostate taken out.
    If only it was that easy for you. Good luck mate.
     
  17. JimInOz Melbourne Australia Jun 6, 2017

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    Congratulations on a magnificent understatement. How long did you have to sit on a rubber ring for? ;)

    Unfortunately my "removal" was too late and that lead to radiation and associated issues.

    And also unfortunately, while our problems can be resolved to a degree, clinical depression is an extremely hard condition to diagnose correctly, treat properly and keep under control long term.

    If you know anybody suffering from this one of the best medicines (in addition to prescribed ones) is just personal support and understanding.
     
  18. jimmyd13 Jun 6, 2017

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    I have a standing line that madness doesn't run in my family, it gallops.

    To my knowledge, none of the men have been affected, but all of the women have. And it seems true that there's a fine line between genius and insanity. Most of us have IQs above 150 (mine, when last tested many years ago was 183). My sister is bipolar and will be on a regimen of various drugs for the rest of her life. She had a happy childhood but began to struggle after finishing university, resulting in a breakdown when she was 20. Most of my family were overseas and, I can tell you, it's no easy thing for a 22 year old to section his little sister. I was working as a field engineer at the time and my manager was incredibly understanding. He gave me unlimited compassionate leave at full pay and just asked to be kept up to date as to when he could expect me to return.

    It is something that everyone needs to talk about. It may never affect you or your family but it needs to be understood for what it is - a manageable illness. If an employee of yours turns around and explains they, or someone in their family, is dealing with this sort of issue you have no idea how much a little understanding and allowance means. Should you ever be in the position I was, knowledge is an incredible help. When you can understand a mental illness in the same way that we understand heart disease, it not only becomes more socially acceptable but more easily dealt with by both those who suffer and those who support.
     
  19. mollydooker Jun 6, 2017

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    G'Day JiminOz ,Oh mate I am sorry to hear that. I play golf with a chap with similar to you and it is not nice. My psa was sitting on 7.5 and jumping to 11 and a 12 needle job showed a 7/10 Gleason so when the surgeon said it was my option ,wait and see / radiation or have da Vinci robotic surgery and be back playing golf in six weeks I took the latter. Cost $36,000 but no rubber ring thank goodness hey .
    I dodged a bullet as post surgery biopsy showed 4 and 4 Gleason .
    Your so correct about support . Very tough on family.
     
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  20. JimInOz Melbourne Australia Jun 6, 2017

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    Thanks mate, I also rode the DaVinci machine first time around, I made a story here to get our members on the right track.

    But back on topic.

    If you're not a doctor or depression specialist, the best help you can give your mate/s who are hit by the "Big D" is support, a shoulder to lean on and an ear to listen, and even a big bear hug now and again (not too often though! :D).