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  1. guppydriver Aug 24, 2021

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    Great Thread....

    I have a little aviation in my blood as well...

    I took the civilian route, I regret not going ROTC a bit, but I was young and a little rebellious in my late teens and early twenties. When I figured out I kind of had to grow up, I really didn't have a choice as to what to be. I didn't choose Aviation, as a young boy growing up in Renton Washington watching new jet liners roll off the assembly line, aviation chose me.

    Like a lot of things in my life, my timing wasn't the greatest, but it's worked out just fine. After instructing and flying cargo in the 90's, I got in with a regional airline in SLC, Utah in the late 90's. Due to recession and 9/11, my 2-5 year regional airline plan turned into a 14 year regional airline plan. I got to play with power levers and thrust levers and met some wonderful people along the way as I tried to make the most of it. Lost a lot of hearing along the way (Thanks EMB-120!)

    When the major airlines started hiring again, I was invited by a carrier to join the friendly skies in late 2011. I found myself in the right seat of the 737 and the right seat of the 787 (well, the bunk mostly) before my kids decided I had to switch seats (i.e college). I've been back to my love/hate relationship with the Guppy for 2 years now, and will probably stay put as a 737 skipper for the foreseeable future.

    I could not agree more with @Mad Dog when he says that anything (other than an Apple Watch...lol...my words) worn in the cockpit is a pilot's watch. I am actively deciding whether to go with Laco or Stowa as my next piece, both two affordable pieces. I don't want to dip into my cash reserve too much in the unlikely event that I get a GMT II call.

    Although a diver....here is my Longines Heritage that I wear quite frequently:

    60341067319__72ED47BD-F2B2-491B-BCD4-6CDECAC6265B.JPG

    The easy times. Dozing for dollars:
    IMG_5409.jpg

    My last trip I just worked. 28 year old co-pilot with a GMT Master II....I made him go back out and double check the gear pins ever time I was so pissed!!!: 64713431219__F6982B42-A18A-4B50-8386-A3D600006E7F.jpg
     
  2. DoctorEvil Aug 24, 2021

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    @guppydriver
    Hey, welcome aboard and thanks for sharing your story too.

    As a former rec pilot and full time aviation enthusiast, I think anyone who can make a career out of flying is so lucky, no matter what the aircraft type.

    Didn't know the EMB-120 was such a noisy aircraft. Hearing loss? Even with headphones on? :eek:
    In a former life, I was a medical officer in the air force so I had some opportunities to fly in military transports like the C-130 and DHC-4 Caribou. The Herc... now that's loud! The loadmasters used to hand out ear plugs to the passengers.

    And WTF is a 28y.o. first officer doing with a GMT-2? Doesn't he know he has to pay his dues? :D

    Nice Longiines too. Looks great on that mesh bracelet. Been contemplating getting one for my Speedy FOIS.
     
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  3. Jantar Aug 24, 2021

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    It’s true there are no go arounds in gliders…and we don’t always land where we started either. Or at an airport for that matter.

    As for stick and rudder skills, we do spend a lot of time flying in close proximity to other gliders at slow speeds for the bank angles we are flying. So coordinated flight is very important.

    Also I think flying tow teaches you fly to well.

    You should try it if you have the chance. It really is something to cheat gravity for a few hours.

    And yeah, the watch is the trilogy speedmaster.
    142233E8-1CC1-4A40-9BC1-5EBCA55F91FB.jpeg
     
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  4. Canuck Aug 24, 2021

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    My late father was in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) for five years, seven months, and three days, from late 1939 until mid 1945. He was an instrument maker, working on aircraft instruments on bombers, mostly. Wellingtons and Lancasters, based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He worked on bank and turn instruments, and artificial horizons. Back in the days when nothing was electronic. He also worked on pilots watches and clocks. When he was involved, instrument mechanics, as part of their job, had to do “flips” which were short flights to test instruments. They were paid 25 cents a “flip”, until the powers that be found out how many bogus flips were being taken. Just imagine! An instrument mechanic might have earned up to $2.00 per day on these flips. What would that be in 2021 dollars. As a non commissioned officer (flight sergeant), he was earning $160.00 per month. He refused a promotions because commissioned officers had to pay for their own uniform dry cleaning.

    Things changed when someone stowed away on a plane on one of these flips, and he was killed when the plane crashed.
     
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  5. DoctorEvil Aug 24, 2021

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    Thanks for the pic.
    What's the glider type?
    And what's the furthest distance you've covered and longest time aloft for? Just curious.
     
  6. 64Wing Aug 24, 2021

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    @guppydriver
    Great looking Longines! And hey, if I'm gonna fly with a young FO, I'd be pleased to work with one that appreciates a good watch. If probably even offer to trade watches just for the leg! :p

    Full disclosure: I'm not much older than your Rolex-wearing FO, but with some gray hair and rather old-timey way of speaking people sometimes look at me like I'm straight out of the Twilight Zone. Great show btw...Serling was a genius.
     
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  7. Jantar Aug 24, 2021

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    I think my farthest flight in one direction was a 66 mile out and return. Most of us fly triangles, and we try to set tasks for the day, depending on conditions. I’ve done closer to 150 miles just flying around. Longest duration has been about 4 hours. I just can’t seem to focus much longer.

    A lot of the pilots I fly with regularly fly farther.

    The glider is the foreground is an ASW27. A very nice modern glider with a glide ratio of 48:1.

    The one behind it with the canopy up is mine. It is a slightly older SZD-55. In ‘91 when it was built it was state of the art. It was the first glider to use an elliptical wing to minimize induced drag and increase glide performance. Most modern gliders use a trapezoidal wing for the same reason but it is cheaper to make. The SZD-55 is still respectable with a glide ratio of 44:1. And it only weighs 474lbs so it thermals wonderfully.
     
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  8. DoctorEvil Aug 24, 2021

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    Thanks for the insights. As an Aussie, we have an affinity for the Lancaster as well because many RAAF personnel served on them during WW2 flying from bases in the UK. I have a similar story from a RAAF engineer who knew a colleague who worked on F-111 strike aircraft. That guy scored a couple of rides testing the terrain following radar. Apparently, the pilot would flip a switch and the plane would just nose down towards the ground until it reached the designated height AGL and would then start "skiing". Now that's a "flip"!
     
    Edited Aug 24, 2021
  9. DoctorEvil Aug 24, 2021

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    Is that 474lbs empty? That's incredibly light given that the average man weighs 70kg (154lbs).
     
  10. Jantar Aug 24, 2021

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    I too have always loved the Lancaster. So purposeful looking. I do hope Jackson will finish his dam busters project someday.
     
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  11. Jantar Aug 24, 2021

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    Yes that’s the empty weight. It is another reason the plane is so nice. It is very easy to rig. Light wings and automatic control hookups.

    The gross weight is 1100 Lbs.

    I weigh 174lb plus 20lbs for my parachute and that leaves me a bit for some water ballast.

    The glider has tanks in the wing leading edges and I think it can carry up to 450lbs or water. I’ve never filled them up though.
     
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  12. Canuck Aug 24, 2021

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    View in flight from the upper gunner’s turret of Lancaster VERA.

     
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  13. Canuck Aug 24, 2021

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    A number of years ago, the Canadian airworthy Lancaster bomber was in our city for a few days. The crew was available for the public to talk to, while the plane was on static display.

    The pilot of the plane was the chief test pilot for Canadian Pacific Airlines (now part of Air Canada). He was flying the plane across Canada on a goodwill tour. He was flying across Manitoba during a rain storm, and the plexiglass cockpit leaked like a sieve. He admitted to wonder what in H_ _L he was doing, flying this crate under such conditions.

    This is a Lancaster for sure. But it has been considerably upgraded with all the latest technology, to make it safe to fly. The pilot admitted that, during an early test flight, he couldn’t get the landing gear deployed! I have forgotten how they eventually managed to do it, but the plane did not fly again until the landing gear had been updated to permit it to operate hydraulically. The loadmaster on this flight was a 92 year old Air Force veteran who had been a loadmaster on a Lancaster during WWII. He was having the time of his life.

    This Lancaster did not see service during WWII. As I recall, it was built in about 1948, and did service for decades off the east coast of Canada, patrolling for submarines, and general coastal patrol.

     
    Edited Aug 24, 2021
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  14. Canuck Aug 24, 2021

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    We have a Lancaster here in Alberta, (Canada), as well. The fuselage on this one had been used by a farmer in Southern Alberta, as a chicken coop! The plane shown in the link resides at Nanton south of Calgary. It is being restored by volunteers and contributions. This plane is fairly complete, but there are no plans to ever make it air worthy. Their fondest wish is to eventually be able to taxi it.

     
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  15. DoctorEvil Aug 24, 2021

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    @Canuck
    Thanks for the videos of the Lancaster. I swear my heart skipped a beat when I heard that first Rolls Royce Merlin start up!
    There's also a Lancaster bomber on static display at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra called "G for George" which saw active service in WW2.
     
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  16. Alpha Kilt Owner, Beagle Parent, Omega Collector Aug 25, 2021

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    Just been through this thread from beginning to end and enjoyed it all.
    Only story I have is when on a flight to Frankfurt came upon a good female friend working the cabin and had an invite to the flight deck which I really enjoyed, two great guys and really welcoming, whilst heading for the gate another aircraft pulled out just ahead of us and the language was fantastic which I won't go in to but basically did the f*******r think he was in a Tesco car Park followed by many expletives :D
     
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  17. DoctorEvil Aug 25, 2021

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    No doubt you've heard of "road rage"? That was "tarmac rage" :D
     
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  18. Canuck Aug 25, 2021

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    This happened locally, likely in the mid-1950s, when we had an RCAF base near my family home. An unfortunate pilot of a U S jet tried a “wheels up” landing not far from my home. I grabbed my Brownie, hopped on my bike, and went to the site. I have no idea what the follow up was on this.

    9B38A91C-EB23-4489-B641-029653D891B8.jpeg
     
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  19. scv55 Aug 25, 2021

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    Hey all!
    Commercial pilot here. I began flying back in 2017, and was an active CFI/CFI-I for over 2 years. Covid threw a proverbial wrench into the prop to say the least. Now I'm flying for a private client which has been a great change of pace compared to teaching in singles. I had a lot of great times as a working flight instructor, I even got an article published in an online magazine. Its a story about a partial engine failure after ferrying an aircraft from New Jersey to South Florida just less than an hour from home! https://airfactsjournal.com/2021/08/approach-i-need-the-nearest-airport/

    Anyways, my future goals are to end up at a 121 operator but not sure who yet. Time will tell!

    [​IMG]

    Always love wearing my 1976 speedy pro when I fly!
     
    Edited Aug 25, 2021
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  20. guppydriver Aug 25, 2021

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    Tons of opportunities on the horizon! Stay the course, and most importantly enjoy the journey. The day will come when you will reflect on your early days as the most rewarding of this endeavor. Thanks for posting! Great story on Air Facts BTW!
     
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