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So... any of our members here have an interest in firearms?

  1. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Jan 31, 2019

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    I'm sure it will just take your time. All it takes is attention to detail.
     
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  2. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Jan 31, 2019

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    That is the problem. I can be very patient with mechanical things that will affect the way a gun functions, like fitting a hand or a cylinder bolt for example, but when it comes to cosmetic things I tend to not care as much and rush.
     
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  3. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Jan 31, 2019

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    I’m just like you I get the mechanicals perfect or as best I can. As far as cosmetics the only way I do well at that is take my time. Work on the items a couple hours at a time. Walk away and come back later and work on the parts one or two hours and repeat the process.

    If I was to just keep plugging away until I’m done as in a rush job. I would leave some flaws in the pieces and just think screw it. It’s good enough. I have refinished several firearms with very good results. Doing things like tig welding up pits or gouges doing a lot of file work.

    On this Colt I could have tig welded up some of the pits but that is a big-time pain in the A.. This Colt came out ok but I could have done a better. Considering as nasty as the Colt was, I can live with this Colt as is. Hey it’s just a shoot’n iron.

    I’m sure your Colt will come out great. Patience is key along with attention to detail.
     
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  4. Professor

    Professor Jan 31, 2019

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    I've found that a cold bluing job is much more even and durable if you use household 2% hydrogen Peroxide wound cleaning solution rather than water when washing away residue of each application before applying a fresh coating.
    A swatch of upholstery "hair pad" made of Dacron or similar artifical fiber is used to lightly scrub away the crusty residue.

    Regular drinking water contains chemicals and minerals that impede the reaction of the bluing solution. Distilled water for use in mixing baby formulas is available by the gallon at larger grocery stores.

    Besides the effect of the H2O2 as a degreaser the water used in these weak solutions (de-ionized perhaps) seems to be free of impurities that would affect the bluing reaction.

    I've managed to produce a deep jet black finish at times using this solution.
     
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  5. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Feb 1, 2019

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    I like using a rust blue for the big bits and a nitre blue for the small bits.

    I've only ever used a cold blue for touch ups. I actually have a Colt 1917 project gun that I am working on and maybe I'll have to do a side by side, doing a cold blue on the 1917 and a hot blue on my New Service.
     
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  6. Professor

    Professor Feb 2, 2019

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    Basically I only consider a revolver to be worn enough to worry about if it has significant cylinder slap. Otherwise being a hair loose is just going to make it more reliable.
    A older double action revolver can seem to lock up loosely if cocked single action but most often when you pull the trigger all the way the lock up is tight.
    To some extent worn parts and cylinder locking notches can be brought back to reasonable tightness by upsetting metal with small hammers and or punches.
     
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  7. nttisch23

    nttisch23 Feb 2, 2019

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    Headed to the range tomorrow! ;)
     
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  8. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Feb 4, 2019

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    This one that I am currently working is an old Army Navy model and the bolt is so worn it doesn't lock the cylinder when the hammer is down. Someone has already peened the bolt before. The hand is worn enough that it barely helps with lock up allowing around an 1/16" of an inch of side to side travel when the trigger is pulled. When I was examining the internals there was enough wear to warrant me replacing all of the parts except for the hammer and the trigger.
     
  9. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Feb 4, 2019

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    Good Job!
    Items wear out you have to do what needs to be done.
     
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  10. Professor

    Professor Feb 4, 2019

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    Yep when all else fails finding parts or making them is best.
    I've made locking bolts and hands for single action BP and .22 rimfire pistols from scratch as well as firing pins for some revolvers and auto pistols. Cylinder pins are fairly easy to make but must be checked for fit very carefully , even a hair too loose and you have to scrap it and start over.
    The bolts I've made for the single actions are superior to the original because I make a separate flat spring pinned to the front end with the center secured by the pivot rather that the two legged originals which break easily. The body is undercut for clearance.
    I use a piece of hacksaw blade to make the spring for the bolt and a piece from a stripper clip spring for the spring of the hand.
    Always remember that these parts should not be very hard, otherwise they can cause excessive wear to the cylinder.
     
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  11. noelekal

    noelekal Feb 4, 2019

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    Voere, you did an expert job polishing and bluing your Colt. Your photographs are really good and that Officers Model Match looks really great in them.
     
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  12. verithingeoff

    verithingeoff Feb 5, 2019

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    scan0001 copy.jpg Back in the 1970s-80s I shot a lot of NASSA skeet at the USAF base at Bentwaters in Suffolk UK.
    Here's a pic that doesn't tell the whole story. I missed the high bird on station one and went on to shoot a 99....happy days...
     
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  13. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Feb 5, 2019

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    Good shooting.
     
  14. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Feb 5, 2019

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  15. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Feb 5, 2019

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    Rust blue and Cold bluing work well for small items. The other day I used cold blue on this Ruger mk2 mag the mag was rusted I took the mag apart soaked the metal parts in evapo-rust to remove the rust and original finish. Degreased the mag, applied one coat of Oxpho blue from brownells and was good to go. The mag looked good enough with one coat of Oxpho blue. I applied the oxpho blue using a small piece of 0000 steel wool rinsed the parts in water then wiped the mag with a light coat of oil and put it back together. Woked fine for my needs.
     
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    Edited Feb 7, 2019
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  16. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Feb 12, 2019

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    Another project revolver from my under water collection. This S&W was under water for several days. I'm finally getting around to work on the firearms. I took the revolver apart soaked some parts in rust remover. I worked on the worst part of the frame that took a lot of file work. Now the revolver needs to have the nickel finish removed, polished up and a new nickel finish applied.

    Since I'm not setup to do plating. I'll drop this one of at one of my friends shop, and let him finish it up. I'm amazed that all the firearms that were under water none of the bores or chambers rusted. Since none of the stampings roll marks & trade marks are in great shape this revolver should come out looking good. This S&W is one of my favorite carry guns. The painters tape is just to hold the crane in place until I drop it off for the refinish work
     
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  17. speedy57

    speedy57 Feb 12, 2019

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    I do watches, guns and cars. Ugh! I'll just add that I love them all, but never wear my good watches, -Rolex, Zenith, Omega- when shooting. Gunpowder residue and shock to the wrist has always been a concern of mine. However, I do wear a watch while driving... lol.
     
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  18. noelekal

    noelekal Feb 12, 2019

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    The "underwater" collection.

    He says ruefully ...

    I've been underwater with collecting endeavors, but in a different way.

    That square butt Military & Police snub ought to be particularly fine with a new nickel finish once you complete your good prep job to its surfaces.

    This one could be brothers with yours.

    From 1954 or so (no factory letter - wild guess based on serial number range). From the wear characteristics it was bound to have been an old lawman's revolver.

    It yet sees regular shooting and carrying use. Two-inch Smith & Wesson K-Frame revolvers might be the best kept secret in the snubbie world. Mrs. noelekal has come to love it in more recent years.

    [​IMG]

    Six shots double-action from 19 yards (steps), on an occasion when I was in a shooting humor. The reason for the 19 yards was that's how far it was from the pickup's tailgate to where the target was set up.
    [​IMG]

    Hi Speedy57;

    I never gave my poor watches any consideration when shooting. So far so good.
     
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  19. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Feb 13, 2019

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    I gave my little snubbie 640 Smith to my mother to carry after I replaced it with my Detective Special. It was a good gun and very easily concealable but the Colt fits my hand better and I like being able to use it single action. I had considered a Smith Chief's Special but I really do prefer the way Colt revolvers are made so I went the DS route.
     
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  20. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Feb 13, 2019

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    Very Nice K frame looks great. They sure are nice snub nose revolvers. The one I have probably dates to 1953 I never bothered to letter the revolver. Using some serial number lists I have C prefix 271xxx shows 1953 close enough for me.
    Speaking for myself these K frame snubs ride great in the back pocket of Levi jeans. No need for a holster although I have plenty of holsters for k frames. Many times I just slip it in my back pocket "wallet pocket".