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So... any of our members here have an interest in firearms?

  1. Panych

    Panych Jan 6, 2019

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    AR-15, Steiner 1-5 used for IPSC
    Blaser R-93, 6.5x55, Zeiss Victory V8, 2.8-20 - my hunting rifle
    Orsis T-5000, 6.5x55, Nightforce nxs, 5.5-22x56 MOAR - for target shooting
     
    38C12953-7609-4FA4-A728-18E59F70A7C7.jpeg 6335E5AC-A62D-4207-A3DE-C9AFF0CE2336.jpeg E364ACB2-36CC-45B0-9F57-0910B5ADF527.jpeg
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  2. KGS1925

    KGS1925 Jan 7, 2019

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    True. Private citizens in the US can legally purchase and possess suppressors in 42 states without a permit. As you stated, they are great for target practice, and using subsonic ammo doesn't upset my dogs. I don't have to worry about neighbours, as I live in a very rural area of Texas. :thumbsup:
     
  3. i20rider

    i20rider Jan 7, 2019

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    I may be catching the tail end of this conversation. But when you say no permit what are you refuring to. Don't want to give the uneducated the wrong impression . You still send in 2 sets of fingerprint cards, the passport photos , the $200 federal tax stamp and the lengthy background check that can take over a year along with a 4473 form
     
  4. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Jan 8, 2019

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    I spent my new gun budget for 2019 in one fell swoop. It isn't the best example but the wear and tear is honest, I plan on saving up and sending it off to Turnbull to be restored in a year or two. The bore is good, the lock up is excellent, and the action is smooth as glass. I already have a set of Altamont Python stocks for it on the way while I look for a correct set of Colt ones.
     
    Python 1.jpg Python 2.jpg Python 3.jpg Python 4.jpg
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  5. KGS1925

    KGS1925 Jan 8, 2019

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    Yes, those are required, but they are not considered permits. You do have to pay for a tax stamp when you first purchase the suppressor, but there are no ongoing fees/licenses or permits required. This tax is similar to paying sales tax on a purchase, except that it goes to the federal government instead of state government.
     
  6. noelekal

    noelekal Jan 8, 2019

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    Looks like an honest usin' gun Waltesefalcon. I think the 4-inch Python looks best even though a 6-inch is kept on hand.
     
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  7. i20rider

    i20rider Jan 8, 2019

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    Ok we are on the same page. Sorry again , I did indeed catch the tail end . Some people use the term permit loosely . I've been in the industry for years. When people hear that you don't need a permit they sometimes think it's a walk-in walk-out kind of situation
    .. iv sold a pile of cans in my day.

    Sorry for the confusion ;)
     
  8. voere

    voere pawn brokers are all about $$$ Jan 8, 2019

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    Congrats
    Very nice addition
     
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  9. KGS1925

    KGS1925 Jan 8, 2019

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    No problem. I agree that there is indeed a process involved in purchasing a suppressor.In my personal opinion, it's not as involved as some people may think.

    Granted, you are subject to a background check, to insure that you are not a convicted felon, not under investigation for family violence and not diagnosed with a mental illness.
    You must register the silencer/suppressor in the NFR and send record of silencer purchase to ATF. ( I use the term silencer only because the Texas Legislature refers to them as such).
    You can then : A. Register to yourself, as an individual . B. Form a trust & register to the trust for personal trust. or C.Register as a corporation. Registering as an individual requires the fingerprints and photos that you mentioned. Trust holders are not subject to fingerprints, photos & authority's signatures. Most attorneys advise option B for personal use, and it can cost approx. $100-500 in legal fees to set this up. The Silencer Shop has streamlined the process by having ready made legal documents that can be used.
    I didn't mean to play fast and loose with the word "permit". Just simply stating that no "permit" is required or involved in owning a suppressor/silencer, like there is when obtaining a CHL, CCP or whatever the designation is by each state. As we both know,that permit has to be renewed periodically, with fees and classes, where the suppressor/silencer is a one time deal per each suppressor/silencer. As a long time firearms Dealer/Collector( and an eighth generation Texan), I just wanted to generally dispel the myth that certain licences/permits are required when owning a suppressor/silencer, and that they are most certainly legal to own in most states once you have gone through the the proper process to obtain one.
     
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  10. Wryfox

    Wryfox Jan 9, 2019

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    To be honest, I like yours way better. I'm tired of seeing pristine Pythons all alone in their pristine boxes, held aloft like Excalibur by collectors. I would take your Python to the range and shoot it, not only for my own enjoyment, but to remind the others there (with faces in horror) that these Pythons were designed to be used as a real honest to goodness firearms. My good friend who was a cop for 20yrs carried one daily and never thought twice about carrying it, even though he heard all the time 'its too valuable!'.

    I'd leave it just as it is, which will allow you to enjoy it immensely more than if you had it restored and left it in a box.

    Harrumph!
     
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  11. noelekal

    noelekal Jan 9, 2019

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    A great harrumph, Wryfox.

    The Python here sees range use mostly, but I'm not above holstering it up for hikes or hunts on our old place at the lake.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Wryfox

    Wryfox Jan 9, 2019

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    Classic Texan...94deg at 4:30 in the afternoon...nice day to go shootin!;)

    Now to exorcise an old painful memory....years ago I bought a Python 8" Target model in 38SPL(yes the hyper rare one even in Python world). Seller thought it was hard to sell because of the size and weak caliber so he asked $350 but I got it down to $275. I knew nothing about them either so I kept it for a few months, never got around to shooting it...so I sold it at a gun show figuring if I got my money back it'd be cool. $275. I hesitate to tell the story because I get the same response every time...the "Fred-Sanford-clutch-your-chest-oh-its-the-big-one" reaction. :eek:
     
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  13. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Jan 9, 2019

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    Thanks for the kind words everyone. I am certain to enjoy this one.

    All of my guns get fired pretty regularly and this Python will be no exception. I much prefer to see the wear on the outside of the gun rather than on the inside, so this one pleases me. The only reason I am considering having it refinished by Turnbull is that I don't like the bit of rust on the barrel down from the muzzle wear and a spot on the cylinder. The refinish will not change the way I use the gun. I go and shoot at the lake near me, so no group of shooters to make look upon me with envy/horror. Here is a family photo of my Colt DA Revolvers. From top and going clockwise, Army Special, New Service, 1917 New Army, Detective Special, and the Python.
     
    DA Family.jpg
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  14. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Jan 9, 2019

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    I see why you say you'd go with the 4" if you had to do it over again. My Army Special and my New Service both have 6" barrels and are a tiny bit unwieldy when drawing from a holster. I also really enjoy black powder revolvers and some of those old designs with 8" or 9" barrels just are ridiculous to carry anyway other than cross draw.
     
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  15. noelekal

    noelekal Jan 9, 2019

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    OOO...!!! Painful indeed Wryfox!

    Your tale goes with one that still causes me to mourn. Years ago I bought a 4-inch Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, one of the "Pre-Model 29" revolvers. A competitor was waiving it around behind the firing line at a high-power rifle match and wanting $300 for it. Could have been a lawman's gun as it exhibited holster wear was commensurate with such a gun. Was wearing early "non-football" rose wood "Coke Bottle" stocks, likely original and the rose wood was a plus. I test fired it right there at the match that afternoon and bought it from him.

    Even sent off for a factory historical letter on it to find it was one of the rare original run of 500 4-inch .44 Magnums and had shipped from Smith & Wesson in December of 1956. Elmer Keith had touted the 4-inch configuration about that time. Letter came in and I thought: "That's neato" but didn't attach so much significance to it at the time. Shot it a bit for a couple of years then decided that I enjoyed shooting the .44 Magnum in my 8 3/8-inch Model 29 better so sold the early 4-inch revolver for a $50 profit.

    My crystal ball is cracked and I couldn't see down the road to the point where the vintage Smith & Wesson rarities' values would rise stratospherically. The same revolver would be worth many thousand at present.
     
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  16. Thrasher36

    Thrasher36 Jan 9, 2019

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    [​IMG]
    1916 SMLE No 1 Mk 3* Still shooting at 103 yrs old
    [​IMG]
    300 Blackout
     
  17. Thrasher36

    Thrasher36 Jan 9, 2019

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  18. noelekal

    noelekal Jan 9, 2019

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    Love seeing your Colts Waltesefalcon! While classic Smith & Wessons have always been my very favorite, I greatly esteem classic Colts and enjoy collecting and using them. The massive and stately Colt New Service is my very favorite Colt revolver of all time. The Colt E and I frame variants: Army Specials, Official Police, Officer's Models, Troopers, 3 5 7s, and of course the Python are an elegant way to do full-sized revolvers that hark back to the superior quality of a bygone era. The D-Frame Colt Police Positive Special and Detective Special are handy and compact.

    Here's the trash and the treasures of the E-Frame tribe here in photographs taken to show the continuation of the basic design from the 1908 introduction of the Army Special all the way to the last model produced which is the Python. Top to bottom: a scroungy Army Special in .38 Special from 1915, a quite decent Army Special in .41 Long Colt from 1925, a World War II contract Commando in .38 Special, a 1953 NYPD badge marked Official Police in .38 Special and a 1957 Officers Model Match in .38 Special.

    [​IMG]

    Unbuttoned. I'd posted a forum narrative elsewhere a few years back on the topic of E and I framed Colts so took these photographs.
    [​IMG]

    The two I-Frame Colts the Python and its premium, uncommonly seen, yet unsung predecessor, the Colt 3 5 7 (not really a very imaginative model name huh). Part for part these two mimic the earlier E-Frame models with the only difference being the frame mounted floating firing pin of the I-Frame versus the hammer-mounted firing pin of the E-Frame. The basic size dimensions are the same between the E-Frame and I-Frame.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  19. noelekal

    noelekal Jan 9, 2019

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    Yea SMLE!

    I have a 1916 dated one here. Quite an accurate rifle it is.
     
  20. Waltesefalcon

    Waltesefalcon Jan 9, 2019

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    Good summary of the E and I frame differences. I'm quite jealous of your collection. That .41 Army Special, the Officer's Match, and the 3 5 7 are all making me drool just a little.
    The New Service/New Army are some of my favorite revolvers. My New Service is chambered in .357 even though it was originally made in 1917. It was re-chambered in the 40s, as apparently many were, and has an action that rivals that of my Python.
     
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