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So... any of our members here have an interest in firearms?

  1. 10mmauto

    10mmauto Aug 31, 2018

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    The 2-1/2" model 66 is a classic. But if I carry a K-frame, I prefer 3"
    DSCN1923.JPG
     
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  2. larryganz

    larryganz The cable guy Sep 1, 2018

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    I plan to get another Ruger SP101 in .357 or a S&W Scandium frame .357 someday. But for now I mostly pocket carry my Kahr PM9 or lightweight S&W model 637 in .38 spl, and sometimes my Glock 19 in the waistband. The larger .357 would not be easier to carry than my Glock.
     
  3. Mtek

    Mtek Sep 2, 2018

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    Hey fellas, have a buying question. I have been looking for a 4” Diamondback (38 not 22lr) and maybe a a nice DS to go with my Python. I’ve seen a couple nice ones on various auction sites I’d like to have. As I don’t have an FFL, how does this work? Any tips appreciated. Years ago I mailed a 1911 off to have it modded through Fedex, and it was mailed back that way, but I was all ready the owner.
     
  4. 10mmauto

    10mmauto Sep 2, 2018

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    You can complete your sale over the Internet (know your seller) but they will have to ship the gun to an FFL. Usually, the seller will ask you to provide them with a copy of the license from the FFL you are going to use and your FFL will either send it to them, or give you a copy to send them. I believe there is an online resource from the ATF that lists current licensees. Also, if you are on a site like Gunbroker, the process should be explained pretty clearly on the site.

    I have always liked the Diamondback. Great choice.
     
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  5. Mtek

    Mtek Sep 2, 2018

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    @10mmauto Thank you. I have been looking at that very site. I haven’t registered or anything, and haven’t read any of the details. The thing is, I’ve always purchased locally, have no relationship with an FFL. I’ll go to my local shop I buy ammo and see if they can help me with paperwork and a transaction.
     
  6. Wryfox

    Wryfox Sep 3, 2018

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    The best advice I can offer is through the Gunbroker website. I have used Gunbroker for years. They have a great help section. As a Buyer, you have the simple part....you pay for the item according to terms in the auction(or what you negotiate), and send FFL info to seller. The seller has the pain of verifying the FFL to ship to and handling the shipping, which is the most contentious part, because shippers change guidelines and have vastly different reqts.

    Below is from the Gunbroker website section on Selling, but is much of what you need to know as a Buyer so you understand the process.....

    Gunbroker Firearms Shipping Guide For Sellers
    Below are some guidelines for shipping firearms and ammunition, along with notes related to specific shippers. We encourage you to review the specific shipper's web site as shippers have different guidelines.

    You must ship to an FFL holder:
    Federal law requires all modern firearms be shipped to a holder of a valid Federal Firearms License (FFL). Any person who is legally allowed to own a firearm is legally allowed to ship it to an FFL holder for any legal purpose (including sale or resale).

    Here is what the ATF "Federal Firearms Regulations Reference Guide"' (ATF P 5300.4) says:

    (B9) May a nonlicensee ship a firearm by carrier?
    A nonlicensee may ship a firearm by carrier to a resident of his or her own state or to a licensee in any state. A common or contract carrier must be used to ship a handgun. In addition, Federal law requires that the carrier be notified that the shipment contains a firearm and prohibits common or contract carriers from requiring or causing any label to be placed on any package indicating that it contains a firearm.

    [18U.S.C.922(a)(2)(A), 922(a) (3), 922(a)(5) and 922(e), 27 CFR 178.31, 27CFR478.31 and 478.30]

    (B8) May a nonlicensee ship a firearm through the U. S. Postal Service?
    A nonlicensee may mail a shotgun or rifle to a resident of his or her own state or to a licensee in any state. Handguns are not mailable. A common or contract carrier must be used to ship a handgun. A nonlicensee may not transfer any firearm to a nonlicensed resident of another state. The Postal Service recommends that longguns be sent by registered mail and that no marking of any kind which would indicate the nature of the contents be placed on the outside of any parcel containing firearms.

    [18U.S.C.1715, 922(a)(3), 922(a)(5) and 922 (a)(2)(A)]

    The section of the US Code governing modern firearms is called Commerce in Firearms and Ammunition (CFA). This code is available online:http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_09/27cfr478_09.html

    When in doubt, we suggest arranging for transfer through a licensed dealer. Violation of the CFA is a felony, and penalties for violation are severe.

    If you do not have a Federal Firearms License:
    Any shipper who does not have an FFL is considered to be an unlicensed person. Unlicensed persons must ship modern firearms to a licensed FFL dealer only. If the buyer is not licensed, they will need to make arrangements to have the item shipped to a licensed FFL dealer in their state.

    Before you ship a gun, the buyer must fax or mail you a copy of the dealer's signed FFL license. You can only ship the gun to the address on the license. You should take the copy of the signed FFL with you when you take the item to be shipped in case the shipper wants to see it.

    Antique firearms:
    Antique firearms need not be shipped to a licensed dealer. They can be shipped directly to the buyer. Click here for a definition ofAntique firearms.

    Knives, air guns, accessories, and most gun parts:
    These items need not be shipped to an FFL holder. Note, however, that each firearm contains at least one part the ATF considers a firearm, typically the part containing the serial number. This part must be treated as a complete firearm when shipping the item.

    Ammunition:
    Ammunition must be shipped separately from packages which contain firearms (including handguns). Special labeling is required. Some shippers treat ammunition as dangerous or hazardous materials. Guidelines vary by carrier, so please check directly with the carrier for specific details.

    Other rules:
    • You must inform the carrier the package contains a firearm.
    • The firearm cannot be shipped loaded.
    • Ammunition may not be shipped in the same box as the firearm.
    Notes on specific shippers:
    Specific shippers, such as US Mail, FedEx, and UPS, have different rules related to firearms and ammunition. Please review their websites for guidelines about shipping firearms and ammunition.

    US Mail - unlicensed persons:
    • Unlicensed persons can ship a rifle or shotgun by US Mail.
    • Unlicensed persons cannot ship a handgun by US Mail. Pistols, revolvers, and other firearms capable of being concealed on the person (for example, short-barreled shotguns and short-barreled rifles) are defined as handguns.
    • Postal regulations allow the Post Office to open your package for inspection.
    • Ammunition cannot be shipped by US Mail.
    You can search theUS Post Office Postal Explorersite for specific USPS regulations regarding firearms and ammunition (Hazardous, Restricted and Perishable Matter).

    US Mail - licensed persons:
    • Licensed persons can ship rifles, shotguns, or handguns by US Mail. In fact, we suggest you use the USPS, as it is now the most cost-effective way to ship a handgun.
    • To ship a rifle or shotgun, you need only inform the Post Office the package contains a firearm.
    • A licensed manufacturer, dealer, or importer can ship a handgun via the US Post Office if the licensed dealer fills out aUS Post Office Form PS 1508and files it with the local Post Office branch where the handgun is to be shipped.
    You can search theUS Post Office Postal Explorersite for specific USPS regulations.

    FedEx Express:
    • FedEx will only ship firearms via their Priority Overnight service.
    • Ammunition must be shipped as hazardous goods via Ground in compliance with "Limited Quantity." Special labeling is required.
    FedEx Ground:
    • FedEx Groundwill transport and deliver firearms (excluding handguns) as defined by the United States Gun Control Act of 1968 between areas served in the U.S.
    • Ammunition must be shipped as hazardous goods via FedEx Ground in compliance with "Limited Quantity." FedEx Ground will accept shipments of ammunition.Special labeling is required.
    UPS:
    • UPS will accept handgun shipments by Next Day Air only.
    • Rifles and shotguns can be shipped by UPS ground service.
    • UPS will accept shipments of ammunition.Special labeling is required.
    Most other shippers:
    Most other shippers will no longer accept firearm shipments. Airborne and Roadway have specifically prohibited firearm shipments.

    Notes on USPS Firearm Regulations:
    We recommend you read the Post Office regulations onHazardous, Restricted and Perishable Matterbefore shipping a firearm through the US Mail.

    The following info comes from the USPS Regulation DMM Issue 54, January 10, 1999, section C-024:

    Page C-39, section 3.0, Rifles and Shotguns: "Although unloaded rifles and shotguns not precluded by 1.1e and 1.2 are mailable, mailers must comply with the Gun Control Act or 1968, Public Law 90-618, 18 USC 921, et seq., and the rules and regulations promulgated there under, 27 CFR 178, as well as state and local laws. The mailer may be required by the USPS to establish, by opening the parcel or by written certification, that the gun is unloaded and not precluded by 1.1e."

    Page C-39, section 6.0, PROHIBITED PARCEL MARKING: "For any parcel containing a firearm or a ballistic or switchblade knife, any marking that indicates the contents is not permitted on the outside wrapper or container."

    The following pertains only to licensed dealers shipping handguns:

    Page C-37, section 1.3, Authorized Persons: "Subject to 1.4, handguns may be mailed by a licensed manufacturer of firearms, a licensed dealer of firearms, or an authorized agent of the federal government......."

    Page C-38, section 1.5, Manufacturers and Dealers: "Handguns may also be mailed between licensed manufacturers of firearms and licensed dealers of firearms in customary trade shipments, or for repairing or replacing parts."

    Page C-38, section 1.6, Certificate of Manufacturers and Dealers: "A licensed manufacturer or dealer need not file the affidavit under 1.4, but must file with the postmaster a statement on Form 1508 signed by the mailer that he or she is a licensed manufacturer or dealer of firearms, that the parcels containing handguns (or major components thereof) are customary trade shipments or contain such articles for repairing or replacing parts, and that to the best of his or her knowledge or belief the addressees are licensed manufacturers or dealers of firearms."
     
  7. Mtek

    Mtek Sep 3, 2018

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    Thank you @Wryfox , my responsibility is pretty straight forward as a buyer.

    I kind of wish I had never searched those auction sites, it’s going to be dangerous to the wallet. I just love revolvers though, and I would like to start a small collection.
     
  8. noelekal

    noelekal Sep 3, 2018

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    The original post to this thread says it all. You are not required to comment or even read in the thread.
     
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  9. Mtek

    Mtek Sep 3, 2018

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    This threads been up over 6 yrs, thank you all for being involved with it.

    I love Canada, I won’t say anything negative about that country or it’s citizens. I’m happy to be an American too.
     
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  10. noelekal

    noelekal Sep 3, 2018

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    I love Canada too Mtek. Have made several trips there over the past few years.

    [​IMG]


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  11. Mtek

    Mtek Sep 3, 2018

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    @noelekal I’m thinking about an old 3” barrel, round butt S&W 38 my grandfather used to have. It was the 70s, and the hammer had the pin built into it. Smaller frame. Any idea of the model? I’m going crazy with older revolver shopping.
     
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  12. noelekal

    noelekal Sep 3, 2018

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    Do you recall if it was a small 5-shot revolver?

    The middle revolver in the photograph below is a Smith & Wesson Model 36 round butt .38 Special with 3-inch barrel. It belongs to a friend of mine out in New Mexico as do the other two Smith & Wesson revolvers. Top is a 3-inch Model 625, the Model of 1989 in .45 ACP. Bottom is a 4-inch Model 15 .38 Special.

    [​IMG]

    Here's an additional photograph of a Model 36 with 3-inch barrel found on Google Images.
    [​IMG]


    Or, perhaps your grandfather's example was nickel plated.
    [​IMG]

    Of course the K-Frame Model 10 .38 Special was produced with round butt 3-inch barrel variants available in both blue and nickel finish, but the K-Frame is a 6-shot medium-framed revolver.
     
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  13. Mtek

    Mtek Sep 3, 2018

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    It was a 5 shot, good call. Blued. My first revolver I ever got to shoot with my granddad.
     
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  14. Wryfox

    Wryfox Sep 4, 2018

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    Jumping into the S&W 36 bandwagon with an oldie.....a true oldie. Not even a 36 yet(started 1957), and not even a "pre 36" yet. It's called a "baby chief", the earliest of its kind....this one produced Jan 1952..introduced at the Police conference that year.
    SW 36 1.JPG
     
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  15. JimInOz

    JimInOz "Helpful Hints from Heloise" of bracelet cleaning. Sep 4, 2018

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    Well, you'd better direct your complaint to the Australian owners of this Australian based forum, which by the way, is open to all races, creeds and colours, no matter what their gun/car/fishing/motorbike/Hooters interests (other than watches) may be.

    That's why I like it.
     
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  16. noelekal

    noelekal Sep 4, 2018

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Any "Baby Chiefs" (collectors' term for the Chiefs Special model) is uncommonly found. There were three front sight variations, the first of the "Baby Chiefs" had the old traditional "half-moon" front sight. Then a ramp front sight was soon added, the ramp having no serrations. Last front sight revision that is correct for the Baby Chiefs was a ramp sight with serrations to break up glare.

    The Chiefs Special I have here may have been produced before yours Wryfox, but shipped afterward. Obviously Smith & Wesson did not ship revolvers in serial number sequence. The earliest observed Chiefs Special having a ramp front sight is said to be serial No. 2945.

    IMG_3919.jpg

    IMG_3920.jpg
     
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  17. noelekal

    noelekal Sep 4, 2018

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    Here's the direct ancestor of all J-Frame Smith & Wesson revolvers including the Chiefs Special (or Model 36). It's a Smith & Wesson Model 1903 chambered for .32 S&W Long, built on the Smith & Wesson I-Frame. The I-Frame and the J-Frame are close dimensionally, the J-Frame being a sort of lengthened I-Frame so that the cylinder would accept .38 Special length cartridges. This is a garden variety example of an I-Frame that was produced in 1917. A jillion of these little revolvers were produced. This one's main attribute is that it's almost a condition rarity.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The checkered walnut stocks on the "Baby Chief" and these hard rubber stocks will interchange with perfect satisfaction on both revolvers. Neither pair of stocks will fit any J-Frame produced after about 1953 as the stocks are too short.

    Notice the more elongated trigger guard bow featured on the two 3-inch Model 36s seen in the above reply to Mtek's post. Another telltale little design revision the early Chiefs Specials don't possess. The flat latch thumb piece is a 1950s/early 1960s feature of the J-Frame revolvers that was discontinued after about 1966 in favor of the more traditionally styled thumb piece.
     
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  18. Wryfox

    Wryfox Sep 4, 2018

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    Hot Jiminy! That's a humdinger if I ever saw one!...(and who am I to argue with S&W on dates and such). You've got a bonafide 1st gen there, Noelekal. When I did the research on mine, I did note I have the second series sight and second latch, and I'm only a mid 4 digit serial. They made several changes early, which make these early variations so valuable. You've got a museum piece there.

    I found mine languishing on the bottom shelf of a local pawn shop, for what folks here in the south call "throw down gun" money ie cheap. Just looked like another saturday night special, except to a keen eye.

    BTW, I didn't know S&W was so progressive....starting to use model numbers when they adopted the use of "computers" in 1957. Holy Cow.
     
    Edited Sep 5, 2018
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  19. noelekal

    noelekal Sep 4, 2018

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    It was one of those "blind hog finds an acorn" moments when I acquired it. I had been budding collector of all things vintage Smith & Wesson. Even had the Roy Jinks book "History of Smith & Wesson" on the shelf, but didn't have a clear grasp of models and variants (still don't - no one does except for Mr. Jinks).

    Anyway, the Model 36 was a hot commodity at the time and was sought by many. Lots of gun magazine articles devoted themselves to it's goodness and its lore. I went one Sunday afternoon to the old Fort Worth, Texas Convention Center gun show which is no longer held. There on an exhibitor's table was an entire "raft" of Model 36s. All two inch round butt blue revolvers. These were used, perhaps police department trade-ins. They were priced from $180 to $225 depending on condition. There may have been 40 of these revolvers on hand. In among them was this lonely example with a $165 price tag dangling from its trigger guard and a funny looking front sight. I asked: "What about that one?" The reply was that it wasn't in as good condition as the others and had the "old-fashioned front sight that nobody wanted." This was probably in the late 1980s Well, I wanted it, particularly because of that front sight's configuration. Wasn't aware the Chiefs Special had ever been made with the "half-moon" front sight and didn't know that meant that it was such an early bird, but just liked it because it was different and because I like old vintage stuff.

    So, it came home. Some time later I ordered the factory historical letter.
     
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  20. Wryfox

    Wryfox Sep 27, 2018

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    Here's a dandy my lovely wife got me for my birthday....12GA AR15...yeehaw!

    20180910_134937.jpg
     
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