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Older Rolex SuperLuminova dials…

  1. Donn Chambers Jul 3, 2022

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    Got a question that has been bugging me for a few weeks. I got a UV flashlight to charge the lume on my watches before I go to bed. I noticed something odd on my Rolex Explorer from the early 2000s that has a SuperLuminova dial/hands. While it glows green (like I expect), it is distinctly a bright blue when under the UV light. See the attached pics. Every other watch I have with SuperLuminova Is the same green under the UV light as it is after I take it away. Only the Rolex is different.

    I’ve searched but don’t see anyone else has noted this. Is this just a thing with these early Rolex SuperLuminova dials?

    E8C18073-0815-43FA-B254-6FB4278D891C.jpeg 5C8DEAC0-09DF-4807-830B-24EDF15E9401.jpeg
     
  2. Duracuir1 Never Used A Kodak Jul 3, 2022

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    ALEJANDRO BOVONE likes this.
  3. Donn Chambers Jul 3, 2022

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    thanks. I know there are different colors of SuperLuminova, but my point was I have never seen one that glowed one color under UV light then another after exposed. Yes, there may be subtle differences, but on my Rolex dial it is a pretty stark difference. I assume they all did this, but I’ve never seen it mentioned anywhere.
     
  4. Donn Chambers Jul 3, 2022

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    I have just uploaded a video to YouTube that shows what I am talking about more clearly:



    I’m showing my Speedmaster FOiS on the left, the Rolex on the right. First under UV light (sorry for the speck of dust), then with it off. You can see the abrupt transition on the Rolex when I switch the flashlight off.
     
  5. padders Oooo subtitles! Jul 3, 2022

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    The visible part of the light emitted by UV blacklights is blue, hence you get a blue cast when you use it, UV lamps differ too so some will look bluer than others. The colour that it glows once the UV is switched off is that of the SL lume, what you see before is a product of both the colour of the glow, and the blue visible part of the spectrum your torch or source emits. The video suggests simply that Rolex and Omega are using different SL formulations. Rolex would have you believe that it is their own special sauce. I am not persuaded by that myself, it is just a different colour.
     
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  6. Donn Chambers Jul 3, 2022

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    Yes, I know the visible part of the UV is on the blue side of the spectrum, but why do all the other watches I have with green SL look green under it? Only guess is the Rolex SL was closer to the blue wavelengths of the spectrum, while the others are closer to pure green. Still a little surprised no one ever mentioned this before.
     
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