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  1. lilwine

    lilwine Feb 14, 2020

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    14207165-rko8enhjculb3z3jmijpey12-Zoom.jpg 14207165-zj276012j3iv9we89nfb1g5h-Zoom.jpg 14207165-rc8j9doldix0hy0ems3i8h70-Zoom.jpg 14207165-t8tfpvf971burjqx8oerj9z9-Zoom.jpg 14207165-hjjbc53ibimm4thb2hszhu7p-Zoom.jpg 14207165-pnyyx4kkzpv143tuokxfoss9-Zoom.jpg
  2. X350 XJR

    X350 XJR Vintage Omega Aficionado Feb 14, 2020

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    First it's not a Calatrava, because it's an Omega and not a Patek. Dial is interesting but barely acceptable to many, a bit too much patina for a dress watch, second hand is incorrect. Case size at 34mm isn't particularly large but certainly quite wearable.

    You could do a lot worse for the money.

    I'm sure others will have an opinion.
     
  3. lilwine

    lilwine Feb 14, 2020

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    Thank you for your honesty.
     
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  4. Rochete

    Rochete Feb 14, 2020

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    Dunno. That reference bears a 269 according to OVDT. No 'Swiss' on dial.
     
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  5. Syrte

    Syrte Feb 14, 2020

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    I like the dial design— those applied markers in the shape of roman numerals at XII, III and IX are very elegant and also I find them quite unusual even though I don’t follow Omega very much. Personally I don’t mind the little bit of patina on the dial either.

    To me the price seems a bit expensive but @X350 XJR knows much more than I do. Also if you find something unusual that you really like there’s no harm paying a little too much once — so long as it doesn’t become a habit.
     
  6. OMEGuy

    OMEGuy Feb 14, 2020

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    My first thought is that this is no early 1960s dial / hand design and I can't find another ref. 121.002-63 with the same or at least a similar setup.
     
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  7. Syrte

    Syrte Feb 14, 2020

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    And so? Agree the style is 1950s. Does the movement serial number not fit with a 1950s watch?
    On the brand that I follow I always ignore sellers date indications— they are often clueless. They sometimess identify watches as 1960s or 1970s when they’re actually 1930s or 1940s. The only thing that matters is whether the various parts are consistent.
     
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  8. OMEGuy

    OMEGuy Feb 14, 2020

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    It looks like a "marriage" to me.
     
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  9. OMEGuy

    OMEGuy Feb 14, 2020

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    You added some text after my response... I was just answering your "And so?".

    The movement serial # I can see in the picture is 19.2 mio.

    Edit: Agree, I should have explained more precisely, why I said something's wrong. I will try to make it better next time.
     
  10. bubba48

    bubba48 Feb 14, 2020

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    The dial is correct (and beautiful) for the early 60s
     
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  11. OMEGuy

    OMEGuy Feb 14, 2020

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    Interesting. Can you show another example?
     
  12. OMEGuy

    OMEGuy Feb 14, 2020

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  13. Gav1967

    Gav1967 Feb 14, 2020

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    ^^^^^^^
    +1
    sums it up for me
     
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  14. Rochete

    Rochete Feb 14, 2020

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    First thing I thought this is a 50s watch then I saw reference came out in 1962 with a 269. I googled reference and couldn't see any similar one. So I concluded there was a big chance of frankenization. Then I couldn't see 'Swiss', which I understand every watch bore long ago by 1962. Too many questions for me.

    I love the patina though...
     
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  15. Syrte

    Syrte Feb 14, 2020

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    There is no « Swiss » visible on the Omega picture of the reference @OMEGuy posted above. So maybe in both cases it’s hidden by the bezel and the curve of the crystal?

    Also one cannot exclude, for watches that are mass produced, that slightly earlier dials stocks are being liquidated or used on some examples of a given reference. A late 50s dial can have been placed at the factory on an early 60s watch.

    pS agree it’s a beautiful dial.
     
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  16. gatorcpa

    gatorcpa ΩF InvestiGator Staff Member Feb 14, 2020

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    Personally, I think the parts are all genuine Omega, but it has been put together as a "Frankenwatch".

    The dial has more of an early 1950's look, but the case and movement are from 1963.

    A nice looking piece, but not worth the money being asked.
    gatorcpa
     
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  17. OMEGuy

    OMEGuy Feb 14, 2020

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    Agreed, the dial looks quite nice and the hands are matching in a way...

    But just for me and facing the facts this is a watch that can't be confirmed to be correct. The other way round, nothing seems to match.

    Coming back to the OPs question I would say buy it, if you love it, being aware it is a put-together. And run away if you are looking for an original vintage watch, go find a real one instead.
     
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  18. Rochete

    Rochete Feb 14, 2020

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    I think the Swiss Made can be seen here, distorted by crystal as you say and also by low pic quality:

    20200215_003616.jpg
    Yep, can't be excluded. Just too many questions. Although to be honest, at 'the right price' I would possibly buy it: dial is very beautiful, case is fine, movement a 30mm... a nice wearer just probably not factory original.
     
  19. Syrte

    Syrte Feb 14, 2020

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    Dial and hands actually match each other from a style viewpoint.
    And the caliber of the OP watch is a 268 and not a 269 suggesting a movement that’s earlier than the reference whose picture @OMEGuy posted above.

    what year is the movement serial supposed to be, exactly? If that movement serial is for sure early 1960s- then there is no proof that it’s a marriage. The case and movement seem unmessed with, crown looks correct— unlike what is often seen on put togethers.

    However the movement holding screws have been turned — unlike the other screws it seems on the movement. And there are no service marks or scratches on the inside case back either- which is consistent.

    So I would say at least the movement / dial and hands do belong together. (Except perhaps seconds hand which seems like a crude replacement).

    Did they pertain to a gold case which has been melted and has anyone retrofitted them to a steel case from a slightly later period? That may be a question.
     
    Edited Feb 14, 2020
  20. mac_omega

    mac_omega Feb 15, 2020

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    Sorry that I am a bit late to the party.

    IMO at least the dial (maybe also the movement) has been recycled from a gold watch.

    I have a 14K YG example with similar uncommon hour markers at 3,6,9 and 12 (although a bit different):

    face.jpg

    It is marked with the reference# 2894 - 1 and has a calibre 267 encased in the range of 16.9xxx mio.

    inner_back.jpg

    When you look this reference up in the Omega data base you find it listed as a "Tresor" from 1958 with cal. 267 but with a different dial which is not uncommon as there were several different dial styles used...

    ODB_Tresor.jpg

    Here a link to the ODB: https://www.omegawatches.com/watch-omega-tresor-omega-ot-2894
    It is listed as OT which means 18K while mine is 14K (OJ) which shows that there different alloys have been used for the cases.
    I am convinced that this Tresor was never built in SS as the Tresor references usually were cased in heavy gold cases.

    My conclusion on the watch of the OP:
    the case is later for sure, maybe also the 268 movement which has a considerably higher serial# at 19.2 mio although it is not impossible that this Tresor has been built for several years, so the 19,2 mio might be possible (but not very likely).
    The hands are not a match.
    Most likely the whole watch is a marriage...

    my 2 cents...
     
    Edited Feb 15, 2020
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