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Need help with my British lingo…

  1. Gav1967 Tend not to fret too much Mar 12, 2023

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    Me too. I recognise all if those situations.
    Apart from Sod off though I don't think my son would use any of them
     
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  2. p4ul “WATERRROOP” to 50m Mar 12, 2023

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    Sod off feels like a term of endearment, my father regularly smiled and told me to…..
    About as close as he and his generation could come to saying I love you!
     
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  3. Gav1967 Tend not to fret too much Mar 12, 2023

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    My other favourite is bugger

    Bugger!
    Bugger off
    Bugger me
    Bugger it
    Buggering thing
    buggering around
    Buggering buggery
    Damn and bugger

    Edit
    Daft bugger
    Soft bugger
    Stupid bugger
    Mad bugger
    Hard bugger
    Big bugger
    Tall bugger

    Ad nauseum
     
  4. DrmexicoII Mar 12, 2023

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    You can never have too much buggering. Well you can, but not in the lexicon sense. ;) I am a prolific user of the word bugger and all its derivatives
     
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  5. p4ul “WATERRROOP” to 50m Mar 12, 2023

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    I can only add “you bugger” to this list!

    Although thanks to Blazing Saddles and The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre we do have “We don’t need no Steenking buggers” in our house.

    Oh and living in Wiltshire Badgers can be substituted.
     
  6. Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Mar 12, 2023

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    Good point. Yep.
     
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  7. M'Bob Mar 12, 2023

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    How about when a woman is referred to as a “Tart”? Is that still used or from back 40 years ago? And is it mostly English or Irish?
     
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  8. DrmexicoII Mar 12, 2023

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    It's used but infrequently. More likely to be an affectionate insult to a bloke - "you old tart" / "you massive tart"

    See also "petal". As in "oh petal" to show fake sympathy for a bloke complaining too much for something minor.
     
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  9. Gav1967 Tend not to fret too much Mar 12, 2023

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    Still used

    Like a lot of these things it depends how you say it and to who (familiarity)
    "You tart" "what a tart" - to a friend (man or woman) with a smile is a sort of term of endearment or a back handed compliment.

    Said with meaning to or about a stranger means a slut or something more derogative
     
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  10. Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Mar 12, 2023

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    Oh and “Quite Nice” isn’t a compliment.
     
  11. M'Bob Mar 12, 2023

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    I actually first heard the phase about 30 years ago, when I started collecting watches. An English collector once told me, “I like my watches original, not all tarted-up.”

    When I later heard someone refer to an overly dressed and made-up woman as a “tart,” I understood the context.
     
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  12. p4ul “WATERRROOP” to 50m Mar 12, 2023

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    Tart.

    The pair of tarts above seem to have this one covered.

    Cheers. Off to the rubba for a pre-scof bevy will expect updates later.;)
     
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  13. DrmexicoII Mar 12, 2023

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    I now feel well and truly accepted in the group ;)
     
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  14. gatorcpa ΩF InvestiGator Staff Member Mar 12, 2023

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    Time for a short Canadian geography lesson, you hosers!

    gatorcpa
     
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  15. DrmexicoII Mar 12, 2023

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    I went out with a Canadian girl for over a year (a long time ago) . Never once when she said the word "mirror" did she pronounce any of the Rs. I remain impressed to this day!
     
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  16. Aroxx Sets his watch Mar 12, 2023

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    My favorite Aussie word I picked up is referring to females as sheilas. Hilarious. Is that only an Aussie thing?

    My whole family is from New England. Not a single R is ever said. I’m from New Jersey so we talk funny in a different way.
     
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  17. Turpinr Mar 12, 2023

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    Nah just a long time fan
     
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  18. Davidt Mar 12, 2023

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    Definitely still in use but usually abbreviated to “any joy?”, usually after an attempt at solving a problem or trying to achieve an outcome.
     
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  19. Mouse_at_Large still immune to Speedmaster attraction Mar 12, 2023

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    In my neck of the woods (North-East Scotland), "fit like" is a fairly common greeting. Comes from the Doric dialect. "Foos yer doos" can also be used.
     
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  20. DrmexicoII Mar 12, 2023

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    I've often wondered if there's anywhere in the world that has so many words for a bread roll than the UK?
     
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