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  1. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    This Omega Seamaster was purchased about 1960. I plan on getting it cleaned and put in working order and gift in to my son. I would like to get some history on it beside just being my dads watch. The cost of cleaning and repairing is about $500 Canadian, the watch maker offered to take it off my hands if I didn't want it, but is not for sale. I remember my dad saying he didn't want the leather watch band and replaced it with the flexible band at time of purchase. At the time I was about 10 yrs old, and that's all I know of this Omega Seamaster. I don't know how to open the press fitted back case.
     
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  2. JwRosenthal Nov 18, 2022

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    Lovely watch. I would opt to take the stretchy bracelet off and put it back on leather for your son- with make the watch really sharp.
     
  3. X350 XJR Vintage Omega Aficionado Nov 18, 2022

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    Looks like a ref 2761, caliber 420.

    Date seems about right.

    DO NOT let the person servicing the watch polish it in any way, except perhaps the crystal.

    Depending on required repairs?, service cost seems a bit steep, $375 US.
     
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  4. Dan S Nov 18, 2022

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    Can you find something softer to use as a backdrop for photos? I am cringing seeing the watch resting on the concrete :D
     
  5. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    Thanks, for the reply, $375 US is about $500 Canadian.
     
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  6. JwRosenthal Nov 18, 2022

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    Just make sure your watchmaker has an Omega parts account or access to Omega parts. They are proprietary and they keep the supply chain very restricted. There are lots of little wearable parts in there so it will undoubtedly need a few. Yours has the original crown which is long discontinued. The current factory replacement won’t look like that, but will have fresh seals in it- so it’s always a trade off in collectible watches of keeping original parts like the crown but compromising moisture resistance.
    Even though you or your son may have no plans of swimming with it, even a humid summer day with sweat on the skin or a freak rainstorm is enough to get moisture in if the seals are not fresh.
     
  7. DaveK Yoda of Yodelers Nov 18, 2022

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    $500 CDN seems high. What city are you in? We have forum members all over the world that can go rough up your watchmaker to encourage a lower rate.

    Edit: If anyone asks, my name is JW Rosenthal
     
  8. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    My dad was a carpenter, so the case is a bit battered up, not to sure if I can do any more damage sitting on the concrete. But thanks for the concern.
     
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  9. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    Thanks for the advice, I live in a small town and hopefully the watch maker does have an account, if not it's going to be a long drive for repair. Had to look up what crown is, now I know. I did a image search of the watch and could not find a match, so I guess this is a bit rare.
     
  10. JwRosenthal Nov 18, 2022

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    Waffle dial, beefy lug Seamaster - they are not too common, and well loved by many collectors. Your father had good taste.
    The waffle dials don’t age well (due to aforementioned moisture getting past the back or crown seals) and yours looks to be in pretty good shape.
     
  11. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    Is there a source where I can find what the original strap looked like or is that to hardcore. If not I'll ask the watch maker. I can't seem to find a match with a image search.
     
  12. JwRosenthal Nov 18, 2022

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    Probably something like this

    8BCD02C2-AF56-45B3-8824-84C406C4DAE9.jpeg

    Basically any 18mm quality leather or reptile, not heavily padded, that tapers to 16 or 15mm at the buckle will be close to what came with it. Color is obviously up to the taste of the wearer. Black or dark brown croc tend to be more conservative and light tan or cognac/whiskey leather can be a little more casual.
     
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  13. Dan S Nov 18, 2022

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    Search for advertising from the era. Generally it would be a flat leather strap with stitching.
     
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  14. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    Nice eye didn't notice that feature. I was going to get this cleaned up, but some folks here say the patina of age is a positive feature. I'll let my son know that.
     
  15. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    Thanks.
     
  16. jjen Nov 18, 2022

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    It’s a very nice example. Make sure the watchmaker knows what he’s doing. If it needs parts and/or a new crystal I think what he’s charging is reasonable. Don’t let him polish the case or tamper with the dial in any way
     
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  17. JwRosenthal Nov 18, 2022

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    It is. Plus when they put the watch to a buffing wheel it takes down material and rounds off sharp edges and factory finishes on the case. It may look “shiny”, but it kills the contours of the case. Just a good scrub with a damp rag or cape cod cloth can do wonders.
    Many of us would rather an honest original watch than one that’s been polished up and lost its originality- but that’s a collectors perspective- doesn’t mean that’s right for everyone.

    But, polishing scratches out of the crystal is fine or even replacing the crystal with a factory replacement- crystals are consumables, but aftermarket crystals generally don’t fit as as well nor have the same shape as the factory ones- and they should still be available from Omega
     
  18. newtech Nov 18, 2022

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    Thanks fore all the info guys, wandering in unfamiliar territory your feedback has given greater confidence in what I'm doing. Although the dollar value is not that important, it would be nice to let my son know this.
     
  19. JwRosenthal Nov 18, 2022

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    And one last note on polishing- note how the back has the very light but sharp engraving on the periphery “waterproof” and “Seamaster”. If a watchmaker puts that to a polishing wheel with a heavy hand- kiss it goodbye.
     
  20. SkunkPrince Nov 18, 2022

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    You are in the right place and you can perhaps follow my same path, because it was a lot like where you want to go.

    IMG_1035.jpeg

    This is my dad's wedding watch. He rarely wore the ring, but he always wore the watch. He gave it to me because he didn't move enough to keep it wound.

    And then my mom died.

    Obviously I put the original bracelet back on (in the right in this pic) and he wore it through her funeral and at some time after until he again realized that he wasn't moving enough to keep it wound.

    Because honor, I searched and found a NOS copy of the bracelet.. and in fact two, to make it long enough for me to wear!

    Your dad's bracelet, you are so lucky. You can get a brand-new Fixoflex bracelet to fit you, while of course keeping his original for history.

    I don't know where you are but, USA? I have a watchmaker you can trust.

    While this pic suggests the dial isn't so bad, it's a bit worn and some dipstick "watchmaker" scratched the dial. Whenever he was asked if he wanted to refinish the dial? He always said no. Therefore, I never shall.

    It has zippo to do with what it's worth, because no one cares. It's your dad's watch.

    Here's an anecdote.

    I was given my grandfather's trumpet when I was a stupid kid. I didn't treat it well. After I decided to start playing again when I was 40 years old, I had it restored. It might have been worth a few hundred dollars. $2500ish after? It was still worth a few hundred dollars.

    My mom seeing me play it before she lost her mind? Her father's horn?

    Priceless.

    trright.jpg

    We'll take care of you. Don't give any attention to "worth" because it's not relevant.

    You're fine.
     
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