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Can someone ID this movement?

  1. PaulHelmuth

    PaulHelmuth Jan 5, 2020

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    Greetings all,

    I am fairly new to the Omega Forums - and this is my first post in this sub-forum.

    I recently picked up what I believe to be a WW II era Mulco; military-style watch.

    But not sure what I have.

    The case is an "ID" which is a US company that operated in NY from 1930-1942 (according to info that I have found on the Internet). Hence Why I believe it to be WW II era (or before).

    Having said that, Mulco is a Swiss Company - so, not sure why the ID case. It appears that all are original together, but that is to my relatively novice eye.

    I have found some info indicating that Mulco only dates back to 1958 - however, I have also seen pretty good evidence (magazine print ads) that the current owners of the Mulco name simply have the company history wrong (with regard to origin date).

    Anyway - the main thing that I am looking for - is some info on this movement - and hopefully some reference to how this movement is stripped. I would like to give this a clean and lubrication - but not sure how this one come apart.

    Any and all comments greatly appreciated.

    Here's the front - still cased...
    P1012091.jpg

    And the back...
    P1012092.jpg

    Dial - with hands removed...
    P1052098.jpg



    Dial side of the movement - dial removed...
    [looks like the caliber # is probably 150 - but I don't recognize the makers logo]
    P1052099.jpg

    Canon pinion removed...
    P1052100.jpg


    Back side of movement...
    P1052101.jpg


    Removed the bridge that captures the seconds-hand axle/staff (not sure what the proper name is for either??)...
    P1052102.jpg

    Balance assembly removed...
    P1052103.jpg

    The "seconds axel/staff" thingy removed.
    P1052104.jpg

    Not sure what the proper procedure is to continue disassembly from here. Specifically, not sure how the wheel that turns the seconds "axle" is removed. I'm thinking that it requires some kind of puller that I don't have - and thus, probably something that I can't work on at this point.

    But will see what kind of info is added.

    Kind Regards,
    -Paul
     
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  2. Canuck

    Canuck Jan 5, 2020

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    Well, for openers, the maker and calibre are stamped into the pillar plate behind the dial. What more might you need to know to identify the movement?

    As to the tool you need to remove the sweep wheel? You need a tool like the one in the picture. It is called a “sweep wheel remover”, and the brand is Presto. The one shown is for removal of a sweep wheel with SIX spokes. You need the version for a FIVE spoke sweep wheel. This tool is easier to find (and probably cheaper) than a replacement third wheel when you snap the extended top pivot off! You probably shouldn’t try it! Your request for info as to how to proceed to strip the watch tells me you are beyond your depth by starting out on an obsolete movement that can provide challenges to a newbie, and especially one you seem to want to preserve!

    This tool has six (or five) “quills” that extend downward between the spokes of the sweep wheel. When you squeeze the bows, the quills extend downward to contact the bridge beneath the wheel. The wheel is lifted straight up.

    DEBF0FDE-19FC-46CA-A45E-37D3E7DACE06.jpeg
     
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  3. PaulHelmuth

    PaulHelmuth Jan 5, 2020

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    Canuck - I did mention that I thought the cal. # was probably 150 - but that I didn't recognize the logo. So, I'll keep looking for that.

    Thank you for the detail on the sweep wheel and the proper tool for it's removal. That is much appreciated.

    Kind Regards,
    -Paul
     
  4. Dan S

    Dan S Jan 5, 2020

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    I will let you out of your misery ... FHF.
     
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  5. PaulHelmuth

    PaulHelmuth Jan 5, 2020

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    :D Thank you Dan.

    I guess that's why Canuck thought I should know it from the logo.

    Apparently the full name being Fabrique d'Horlogerie de Fontainemelon.

    [according to Watch Wiki...]
    Founded in 1793 under the name "Benguerel & Humbert" and is the oldest Ebauche movement manufacturer in the world.

    But I hadn't heard of them - or seen the logo.

    Thanks guys!
     
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  6. CaptainWinsor

    CaptainWinsor Jan 6, 2020

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    4DC2341F-3C03-430C-8A4B-C22539AF0C8A.jpeg
     
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  7. Canuck

    Canuck Jan 6, 2020

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    Often called Font which is an abbreviation of Fontainemelon. But FHF 150 is all you need.
     
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  8. PaulHelmuth

    PaulHelmuth Jan 6, 2020

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    Captain Windsor - thanks!

    Very cool print ad.

    Of that group of marks - I am only familiar with FHF (very recently), AS (pretty recently), of course I knew ETA. Have been familiar with UT for a while.

    I don't come in to contact with watch movements other than my own - and have only recently acquired some vintage movements (Omega, AS, and FHF). The vast majority of my mechanical movements are modern ETA or Sellita copies.

    -Paul
     
  9. PaulHelmuth

    PaulHelmuth Jan 6, 2020

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    Thank you sir!

    I get it now - but had no idea 24 hours ago :D

    -Paul
     
  10. CaptainWinsor

    CaptainWinsor Jan 6, 2020

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    If you google watch makers marks you’ll get lots of images

    D11C573F-AE72-4B75-AD51-F2F62B6644FE.jpeg
     
  11. PaulHelmuth

    PaulHelmuth Jan 9, 2020

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    That's a lot of logos/marks!
     
  12. PaulHelmuth

    PaulHelmuth Jan 11, 2020

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    Okay - did some research, ordered a tool - and proceeded with basic service (clean, inspect, lube).

    Following @Canuck 's advice - I purchased the Bergeon Presto 30638-3. That's the puller for wheels with an odd number of spokes.
    P1102124.jpg
    P1102126.jpg
    That made pulling the sweep wheel very easy - even for a first-timer. There were a few other bits relating to a center-seconds via sweep-wheel that were new to me - but not particularly complicated.


    Here is the timegrapher trace initially...
    PC312085.jpg
    Running too poorly for the timegrapher to sort out the noises.

    Here it is after cleaning an fresh oil (and grease)...
    P1112156.jpg
    By no means ideal - but considering that I know that both end-stones need to be replaced - as well as the mainspring, I am pretty happy with the results.

    I have ordered a new mainspring - and a large assortment of hole and cap jewels for wristwatches - hoping that I can find something in there for the end-stones.


    Here is the re-cased watch after reassembly and a couple of other reassembly pics.
    P1112150.jpg
    P1112147.jpg
    P1112143.jpg
    P1112139.jpg
    P1112130.jpg

    Thank you all for your comments and contributions.
    -Paul