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  1. Dedalus05

    Dedalus05 Mar 14, 2019

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    I see this vintage Seamaster has come up in my area, and might be got at quite cheap. I recognise it will need a service. But what do you think in terms of authenticity, value, and condition? The pics are all that are available I'm afraid. I might be inclined to take a punt if I can get it at a decent price, and worry about authenticating the movement after the fact. Unwise?

    D

    Capture2.JPG Capture1.JPG Capture.JPG
     
  2. connieseamaster

    connieseamaster Mar 14, 2019

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    Honestly, the spots on the dial kind of look like mold. So in this case, I think a movement shot is mandatory before plunking down money. I'd be very worried that the movement is little more than a hunk of rust.
     
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  3. Dr No

    Dr No Mar 14, 2019

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    Dial, hands, crown original. Unpolished case. Good candidate for restoration if the movement's in decent shape.

    Art
     
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  4. Edward53

    Edward53 Mar 14, 2019

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    If it runs for more than a few minutes and it's cheap, it's worth the risk IMO.
     
  5. Hamish02

    Hamish02 Mar 14, 2019

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    If it’s cheap, take a punt. Movement could, and hopefully will, be good after a service. Then you’ll have a nice original ‘50s Seamaster :)

    Mine says hi...

    CFB421EB-B144-4D46-AA62-F249ABC3AA48.jpeg
     
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  6. Dedalus05

    Dedalus05 Mar 16, 2019

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    Dr No. - when you say 'restoration' what are you suggesting? A deep clean, occasional part, new strap? Or would you suggest someone do something to the dial?

    I ask, cause I've a bit of cash, and a some free time. So I'm kinda, sorta half-thinking of getting myself some tools and tackling the job myself. I figure if I service two watches myself I'd make my money back on the tools.
     
    Edited Mar 16, 2019
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  7. Dr No

    Dr No Mar 16, 2019

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    I would leave the case, dial, and hands as is. What I mean by restoration is bringing the movement back up to snuff, which includes replacing parts in marginal condition. In my experience, a watchmaker can be inclined to reassemble a movement with parts that should be replaced but are (a) still functional and (b) difficult to source. Ask me how I know.

    :mad:

    Omega bumper movement parts are generally still available, but it won't be long before that condition changes.

    Art
     
  8. Shabbaz

    Shabbaz Mar 16, 2019

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    Pass... unless it's $ 100...
     
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  9. JimInOz

    JimInOz "Helpful Hints from Heloise" of bracelet cleaning. Mar 16, 2019

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    I thought that too when I started. Then the last set of screwdrivers I bought cost me about USD$400. New Loupes $90, lubricants AUD$250, it's never ending, and that's not counting watch parts that may need replacing due to wear and tear, or you "learning a lesson".
     
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  10. Davidt

    Davidt Mar 17, 2019

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    I wouldn't buy it because of the dial.

    However, if you can live with the dial, whether you should buy it or not comes down to price. It needs to be cheeeeeeap
     
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  11. Dedalus05

    Dedalus05 Mar 17, 2019

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    Sure it's extreme hubris. And I'll likely not - as I've a tendency to sit on my ideas for a month or two to give them a chance to germinate (or wither). It will depend to a certain extent on whether I get this watch at a decent price - which looks like something a beginner can safely practice on with cheap tools/lubricant without destroying some small part of humanity's legacy.

    I've put together shopping carts on Amazon with some variation in combinations and quality for the following. I reckon I can get what I need delivered to my door for a little less than Euro 450 all-in - no $400 screwdrivers here:

    Antimagnetic Brass Tweezers
    Bausch & Lomb Watchmaker Loupe, 10x
    Bausch & Lomb Watchmaker Loupe, 5x
    Bergeon 4040 Extensible and reversible movement holder Watchmaker Tools
    Bergeon 55-710 Set of 4 Oilers Plastic Watch Repair Kit
    BERGEON 6938 Watch Dial Protector
    Bergeon Professional Cleaning Rodico
    Blitz Gem & Jewelry Cleaner Concentrate (8 Oz) (2-Pack), Jewelry
    Digital Caliper, Adoric 0-6" Calipers Measuring Tool
    Disposable Latex Finger Cots 200pcs
    Spring Bar Tool Set
    EURO TOOL Waterproof Jaxa Style Watch Case Wrench | CWR-770.00
    Foxnovo 5pcs Different Sizes Precision Flat Blade Slotted Screw Driver Screwdrivers 0.8-1.6mm
    Friction Ball Watch Case Opener
    Pegwood
    16 MM Brass Basket Parts Holder Ultrasonic Cleaning Mesh Screw Type Watch Tool
    Watch Hands Removers Replace Tool Repair Set Of 2
    Moebius Multi-Purpose Lubricating High Grade Swiss Oil
    New Plastic Watch Dust Sheet Cover/Tray
    Pithwood
    Polaroid Silicon Squeeze Bulb
    Polywatch Plastic Lens Scratch Remover
    Watch Case Back Opener
    Set 3 Wristwatch Hands Watch Hand Setting Presser Pressing Tool 0.5 - 2mm
    Ultrasonic Cleaner, Fosmon Professional Jewelry Polisher with Digital Timer [18 Preset Cycle | 600mL Stainless Steel Tank] for Eye Glasses, Watches, Earrings, Ring & More
    VAPKER 950 Pcs O Ring 0.5mm Watch Back Rubber Gasket set O-Ring Gasket Seal Replacement O-rings for Watch Backs 19 Different Sizes 12-30mm
    XOOL Heat Insulation Silicone Repair Mat
    YaeTek Professional Watch Demagnetizer/magnetizer Demagnetization Machine Watchmaker Repair Tool
    YaeTek Watch Timing Machine Tester Tools Multifunction Timegrapher
     
  12. ChrisN

    ChrisN Mar 17, 2019

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    Which book are you buying? If I were you, I'd get a book first and read that to see if it appeals.

    It's really not so easy as it might appear and you'll undoubtedly damage parts and will struggle to get them clean so, they will probably wear faster.

    These bumper calibres are also quite difficult to work on. Have you thought of trying first with an ETA 6497/6498 clone? That's how we start on courses. Keep the bumper until you've built up experience.

    Regards, Chris
     
  13. Dedalus05

    Dedalus05 Mar 17, 2019

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    Thanks Chris. This seems like sound advice. As I say my methods about going thru these things are fluid, and I may have piped up a touch early. It'll be a month or two at least before I decide whether or not to pull the trigger on anything. Would you recommend any particular book?
     
  14. Shankified

    Shankified Mar 17, 2019

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    Ouch
     
  15. ChrisN

    ChrisN Mar 17, 2019

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    I'd start with De Carle but others may differ. Available on Kindle for buttons.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B00D45EI2Y/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=&sr=

    Read chapter 4 and see if it appeals. That just shows a basic movement disassembly. As Jim says, you'll never save money doing this but, if you're interested, it's a nice thing to be able to do.

    Cheers, Chris
     
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