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  1. Christian85 May 28, 2021

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    Hello all, I have recently received a Longines watch that was owned by my late grandfather, the only details I have of the watch are he purchased it in the 50’s, maybe earlier. My Nan says it's 18kt Gold, there's nothing on the back of the watch, just plain Gold, the strap is gold and doesn't seem like it can come off, It's manual winding and that's about it. I'm trying to find what model it is as I would like to find out the history on the watch and how many units were made etc. It also has a broken clasp so trying to figure out where in London I can take it to be fixed.
    This watch will be going nowhere and it will be passed down through the generations to come.

    Thanks for any help and information. Christian.
     
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  2. Dan S May 28, 2021

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    If you have a watchmaker open the case and remove the movement, you can take photos of the inside, including the serial number and any other marks, numbers, stamps, or engraving on the movement or inside the case. Post the photos here and we may be able to help; certainly we can tell you the movement caliber and the approximate production date. Also, you can submit the required information to Longines through their website and they will give you historical information (Extract of the Archives) about when the watch was made and where it was delivered at no cost. The watch probably has no particular model name, and they will not tell you how many were produced, but you will get other information from them.

    The clasp can be repaired by a good custom jeweler.
     
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  3. Christian85 May 28, 2021

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    Brilliant thanks for the info. Will try and get it to a decent watchmaker. I’d love to be able to wear it but the strap is just too small for me. Ugly see if I can get a leather one put on.
     
  4. Dan S May 28, 2021

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    Unfortunately, I don't think that will be easy since there are no lugs. That is the unfortunate thing about that type of bracelet. Once it is custom-fit, it's not easy to change. Depending on how much length needs to be added, you could perhaps use a clasp extension.
     
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  5. OllieOnTheRocks May 28, 2021

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    It's a beautiful watch, I hope you manage to fix it soon. Wonderful heirloom!
     
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  6. Syrte MWR Tech Support Dept May 28, 2021

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    Rebecca Struthers is a master jeweler and British Institute of Horology qualified watchmaker based in the UK,
    she makes incredibly fine wrought cases and all sorts of stuff in precious metals and won numerous awards.

    If you really wanted your watch repurposed for a leather strap i bet she might be able to craft lugs for it, but you will be losing some of the originality of the watch and she could also probably figure out a creative way to lengthen the strap with extra gold—
    Anyhow I’m sure she would be good advice and be easy to find.
     
    Edited May 29, 2021
  7. SkunkPrince May 28, 2021

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    What we call in the US a "manufacturing jeweler" can solder the clasp back on and should be able to fabricate an adapter for you to wear it.

    Another possibility is to purchase a case from Longines, if they have one to accommodate that movement, that has lugs.
     
  8. CDCD May 30, 2021

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    You likely wont be able to find out what the production number of it was. but you can always contact Longines heritage to get an archive extract.

    My advice is do not pursue the strap change. You will essentially be compromising the originality of your grandfather's timepiece.

    Try to have an extension added (even if it is not aesthetically pleasing but rather functional). Give it a few years of wear on the bracelet and you may find it to grow on you.

    If you post caseback photos I'll tell you who the casemaker was.
     
  9. Christian85 Jun 1, 2021

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    Thanks again for all the replies, having thought about it more I think I’m doing to get the bracelet fixed and not worry about wearing it. For insurance purposes are these kinds of watches hard to value? Or will any decent watch shop be able to value it?
     
  10. alex_b Jun 1, 2021

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    Others on the forum will probably have better London suggestions than me, but I would start at at Farringdon’s Jewellery on Grenville St. They’re a family owned jeweller specialising in vintage who I use regularly. Watch wise they only really deal in Rolex but I’m sure will be able to point you at someone decent in Hatton Gardens.