Forums Latest Members

Thoughts on this moral quandary?

  1. YVR785 Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    115
    Likes
    102
    You inherit a $5k (market value) vintage watch from your respected grandfather. It’s too small for your wrist, its style is outdated, and it is damaged from years of wear.

    Is it immoral to sell the watch, and then use the funds for another watch of similar value?

    How would you approach this morally?
     
  2. wagudc Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    4,453
    Likes
    11,221
    I think we need to see the watch to answer the question, but in general my advice is to sit for at least a year. Speaking from personal experience, tastes change. You will never be able get your grandfather's watch again.
     
    Mark020, Twocats, iamvr and 11 others like this.
  3. Dan S Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    19,074
    Likes
    43,853
    It depends on the family dynamic, but selling it would deprive future family members of the opportunity to enjoy the heirloom. If that's not a consideration, then I don't see a problem in selling it. I agree that it would be helpful for us to see it. If the watch is collectible, you might want to hold onto it. If it's just a broken hunk of gold, maybe it would be ok to sell.
     
    Archer, MDubs and YVR785 like this.
  4. GuiltyGear Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    445
    Likes
    1,312
    I wouldn't personally see any of the choices as moral or immoral. It's your watch and whatever you decide, it's the choice that works best for you.

    If I was in your place, I'd keep the watch. It can be serviced, the case refinished, and whatever's needed to bring it back to full glory. Money comes and goes, but the memories of that watch are unique.
     
  5. X350 XJR Vintage Omega Aficionado Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    12,934
    Likes
    30,521
    Is there anyone else in the family that might be interested in the watch?

    Do you really need the money?
     
    YVR785 and kkt like this.
  6. blufinz52 Hears dead people, not watch rotors. Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    2,834
    Likes
    7,235
    How would your grandfather feel if you told him you sold his watch? Only speaking for myself, I wouldn't sell something my grandfather passed on to me.
     
    apsm100, Archer, MDubs and 2 others like this.
  7. DoctorEvil Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    1,342
    Likes
    2,570
    Firstly, sorry to hear of your loss. Regarding the watch, you have to ask yourself a few questions. Is the sentimental value enough for you to hold on to it and keep it as is? Or do you really need the cash? Did your grandfather make his wishes known to you before he passed? Did he indicate that it's OK for you to do whatever you want with it? Are there other family members who have indicated an interest and would want to keep it? Would you feel the same internal conflict if it was some other object like a car? At the end of the day, there's no right or wrong answer here. Ultimately, it's your decision what you do with it and you just have to be able to sleep at night. Do what feels right for you. As long as you're not breaking any laws, I wouldn't worry so much about what others might say.
     
    Canuck and YVR785 like this.
  8. YVR785 Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    115
    Likes
    102
    Thank you all for sharing your thoughts on this matter.

    It’s a black dial Rolex 16030 from the early 1980’s. The watch was his daily driver for decades. Aside from his day job, he enjoyed diving and the outdoors, and each ding on the watch reminds me of his rustic and utilitarian approach to life.

    I am the only beneficiary of the watch.

    I will likely never sell it. I have no other tangible memory of him. However, it is most likely going to sit and collect dust, and be of no practical use to anyone. Just wanted to see how others would think about this. Thanks again!
     
  9. Dan S Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    19,074
    Likes
    43,853
    That is a collectible watch and the 36mm case is very wearable and versatile, especially with the engine-turned bezel. While you feel it is too small at the moment, that may be a reaction to the ridiculously oversized watches that are currently in fashion. It's really not a small watch, and I wouldn't be surprised if the day comes when you might want to wear it.
     
    Retsamaes, Mark020, YVR785 and 11 others like this.
  10. Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    12,678
    Likes
    50,178
    I will echo @Dan S … Let it grow on you. To act as devils advocate though…I was given the opportunity to take a pristine 36mm blue dial two tone for a test drive a while back. I have large wrist and own and wear watches as small as 34mm. There was something about the design that looked small and fussy on my wrists. i would have had to have the bracelet expanded as well. I could not keep it. If you are having the same experience, I totally get it.
     
    YVR785 likes this.
  11. GuiltyGear Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    445
    Likes
    1,312
    The DJ 16030 at 36mm and 44mm lug to lug is absolutely not a small watch. I'm wearing smaller lug to lug than that with a 19cm wrist. Most importantly, it's a beautiful watch. Indulge us with some pictures.
     
    YVR785 likes this.
  12. kingsrider Thank you Sir! May I have another? Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    2,701
    Likes
    5,439
    My father passed away last July. If he is looking down and watching me right now he may be losing his spiritual mind. He had a collection of hundreds of watches and pocket watches. They are being sold one by one. I have not started on the pocket watches yet. The wristwatches are being sold by a, least desirable to me, grading system.
    My sister, who is no dummy, grabbed a Patek 18K with 18K mesh bracelet and claimed it as having sentimental value :cautious:. Luckily, there are some nice Omega's that I am adding to my collection. The rest are estate pieces to be liquidated. I don't think I ever saw him wear the same watch twice, with the possible exception of a Seamaster that my mother gave him as a wedding present (I have it now).

    I did inherit a watch from my uncle and as it happens, an Omega. A small late forties gold watch, redialed and over polished. I have never worn it and it resides in a box. I could not bring myself to sell it.
     
  13. ghce Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    3,278
    Likes
    32,066
    If it's cosmetics that are holding you back from wearing it and if the cash is not an issue get it refinished and wear with pride knowing that you are preserving a family heirloom that can be passed down thru the generations but it would pay to get your grandfathers life and history watch included on paper as I have found past generations really do become a mystery to those that come after us, not only will you preserve family history but you will also increase the watches value with it's written provenance.
     
    YVR785 likes this.
  14. Archer Omega Qualified Watchmaker Nov 18, 2023

    Posts
    26,706
    Likes
    66,315
    I have my grandfathers watch. It’s a very small men’s Bulova, that I restored but never wear. I wouldn’t think of ever selling it. It will be passed on to someone in the family...
     
  15. hen Nov 19, 2023

    Posts
    1,558
    Likes
    4,249
    Keep it! It sounds like you liked the man. Or wait for the next Rolex bubble?

    Got a Geneve from my mothers father, he was a mean SOB. If it wasn't an Omega and beautiful I would sell it.
     
    Edited Nov 19, 2023
    YVR785 likes this.
  16. rootbeer7 Nov 19, 2023

    Posts
    492
    Likes
    1,138
    Great points made here. My only addition would be to think what your Grandfather would say if you told him you were going to sell. Would he say “go for it and buy something you really love to remind you of me”. To go through life collecting trinkets that serve no purpose sitting in draws gathering dust makes no sense. Converting them into something of use to be worn, or displayed that brings daily pleasure makes more sense.
     
    YVR785, Evitzee and wagudc like this.
  17. theluckyluke Nov 19, 2023

    Posts
    388
    Likes
    324
    Letting it rest is a good idea - taste can change quickly in this space and once sold it’s lost. But perhaps don’t put it in a drawer, somewhere safe but more « visible » could get you to start wearing it. Otherwise it might be forgotten for a long time.

    I am a practical thinker - the meaningful connection for this to stay in a family is knowing someone enjoyed the watch and wore it - more than the object or the brand itself. If there isn’t this, it’s « only just » a nice watch for the next person.
     
    YVR785 likes this.
  18. theluckyluke Nov 19, 2023

    Posts
    388
    Likes
    324
    I fully agree. Keeping something from a previous generation because they wouldn’t want this to be disposed or sold isn’t perhaps the best way forward. Ultimately they enjoyed it and that’s the most important, so you also have the rights to pick your own things to enjoy.
     
    YVR785 likes this.
  19. Davidt Nov 19, 2023

    Posts
    10,611
    Likes
    18,463
    I’m struggling to see how an 80’s 16030 is too small and outdated?
     
  20. loniscup Nov 19, 2023

    Posts
    336
    Likes
    429
    As others already said, give it some time, don't hurry on this decision. It's a Rolex after all, it won't lose value and if that happens it would be minimal. My father left me a few watches and I sold one, a Tag Heuer 2000 that I didn't like at all (and still don't). Not a watch of value as you understand, but as time passed, every time I see one for sale, I think of that stupid decision!
     
    YVR785 likes this.