Forums Latest Auctions Members

Rolex Price Evolution

  1. Thrasher36

    Thrasher36 Dec 1, 2019

    Posts
    251
    Likes
    446
  2. Canuck

    Canuck Dec 1, 2019

    Posts
    5,558
    Likes
    13,454
    When I started working for a Rolex dealer in 1965, the price of a model 1603 Date-Just in steel and 14-karat gold was $495.00. The price on a Day-Date model in 18-karat on the 18-karat President bracelet was $1,995.00. In 1971, the Air-King date on an Oyster bracelet was $215.00. In 1982, the Air-King with no date (model 5500, on an Oyster bracelet) was $892.00. In 1982, the 160133 model was $3,120.00, and the Day-Date 180388 model was $10,000.00. You wonder what the 1982 price for any other Rolex model was, get back to me. I have a 37 year old Rolex price list.
     
    larryganz, Eve and orlis like this.
  3. absoluteczech

    absoluteczech Dec 3, 2019

    Posts
    78
    Likes
    68
    Now imagine in 2050 what the prices will be.
     
  4. Cozmopak

    Cozmopak Dec 3, 2019

    Posts
    140
    Likes
    405
    I’ve heard from multiple collectors and dealers that if you do it right, watches will rise in value approximately in step with the markets and that Rolex is a fairly safe bet in this regard. Perhaps there’s some truth to that adage but it doesn’t inform my collecting.
     
  5. mjb

    mjb Dec 4, 2019

    Posts
    251
    Likes
    280
    I would suggest that today, like the American stock market, Rolex is priced for perfection and there is little headroom for further increases. Yes, generally they do very well in retaining value, but today when you have to pay a 50% or more premium over MSRP to obtain even a used modern Rolex, that does reduce the opportunity for gains.

    I say that because Rolex is not going out of business nor (as far as I know) reducing production levels.

    I don't buy watches as investments, I buy them to enjoy.
     
  6. squarelug

    squarelug Dec 4, 2019

    Posts
    241
    Likes
    159
    $10k in 1982 for a day date is impressive
     
    scv55 likes this.
  7. Cozmopak

    Cozmopak Dec 4, 2019

    Posts
    140
    Likes
    405
    I don’t buy watches as investments either. I was under the impression that the best value retention, though, was in the vintage market rather than in modern pieces. The margins there tend to be slimmer between what the dealer pays and what the consumer pays. Of course the prices also are probably more arbitrary.