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  1. Alpha Kilt Owner, Beagle Parent, Omega Collector Nov 13, 2016

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  2. cicindela Steve @ ΩF Staff Member Nov 13, 2016

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    My uncle brought back some post cards from France after WWII, don't recall them looking like these though :whistling:
     
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  3. Alpha Kilt Owner, Beagle Parent, Omega Collector Nov 13, 2016

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    Ah yes the p.m. kind ;)
     
  4. Jking something intelligent and witty... Nov 13, 2016

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    Pretty cool stuff. Thanks for sharing.
     
  5. Alpha Kilt Owner, Beagle Parent, Omega Collector Nov 27, 2016

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    A couple more,

    IMG_0934.jpg

    IMG_0935.JPG
     
  6. sphinx77 Oct 8, 2018

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    Probably because these above were taken from 1910-17 period, pre WW1 into WW1 era.
     
  7. sphinx77 Oct 8, 2018

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  8. Muddlerminnow Feb 1, 2019

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    These are great images--deltiology is probably as addictive as horology--and can be pretty expensive too.

    In the late 1980s I spent a summer in the south of France--mostly Bordeaux and Montpellier--and at flea markets and shop stalls I purchased a copious number of cards--mostly French, but also some Russian and German cards, and some from God knows where--and these became the basis of an art project that occupied me for a few years. Some of the cards were treated directly with ink and dispersions, which I could manage to do easily enough while traveling. That's one advantage of postcards--they are small. A couple of these are pictured below.

    Back home in the states over the next two years, I tried something else: some postcards were photographed with an 8x10, then printed about 4 x 6 feet--then mounted on canvas--then treated again with chemical dispersions. I was naive and reckless back then, breathing in way too much asphaltum--but the results were very satisfying. A few of these are also pictured below.

    NB the photos are not great--they are scans from 35mm duplicates from the late 1980s/early 1990s--.

    Postcard paintings:

    FramingOfTime.IG.jpg



    TheCryptofKiefer.IG.jpg
    TravailOfLaurel.IG.jpg

    The larger dispersion paintings:

    DiscoveryOfAlterity.IG.jpg


    FamilyReunion.IG.jpg


    LoggersPtg.IG.jpg
     
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  9. allwoundup Feb 1, 2019

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  10. Muddlerminnow Feb 2, 2019

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    Thanks for the kind comment--.

    The postcard paintings and dispersion studies were largely just that--studies for the larger photographs. There's a lot of repetition and variation in an effort to work out certain material/visual issues. Ultimately, a lot of them ended up getting thrown out, or given away to friends, or lost in the many moves I've made since the late 1980s. But a few have stayed with me:

    DispersionStudy7.IG.jpg


    DispersionStudy8.IG.jpg

    The larger dispersion paintings--these are about 4 x 7 feet:


    ApproachOfFiction.IG.jpg


    PostureOfTimePtg.IG.jpg
    They are the work of a young artist in love with epic themes--. Things changed a lot over the decades, but I'm just now puttering through my archive (not to self: it means you are getting old), and the thread on the postcards caught my eye so I wanted to add a little to it.
     
  11. allwoundup Feb 2, 2019

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    Thanks for sharing your work. It is wonderful to have a physical "archive" of one's creativity upon which to reflect.

    From previous posts I recall that you are located in upstate NY. Stay warm, my friend. Only a few more months until trout season. Cheers!