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Need help with my British lingo…

  1. TimeODanaos Aug 6, 2023

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    Maybe fify... ::book::
     
  2. sheepdoll Aug 6, 2023

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    Omnibus.

    Many of them made it to america and became the iconic covered wagons.

    Always interesting to see them in drawings of 18th century london. Looking out of place.

    Coaches became the classic wells fargo wagon. Many of these were already a century old when imported to the California gold fields.

    IMG_0374.JPG
    Ironically I got mad and left that bank earlier in the year.
     
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  3. M'Bob Aug 6, 2023

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    “You havin’ a laugh?” When is this typically used?
     
  4. MRC Aug 6, 2023

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    Only time I think I've heard it is in the HBO series Band of Brothers. But the "English" phraseology in that production was intended mainly for an American audience so ::stirthepot::
     
  5. Peemacgee Purrrr-veyor of luxury cat box loungers Aug 7, 2023

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    Once again, a phrase of ‘southern’ origin that has spread countrywide.

    A simple translation would be
    “Are you serious?”
    Or more aggressively
    “Are you taking the piss?”
     
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  6. Gav1967 Tend not to fret too much Aug 7, 2023

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    Mostly used as a sarcastic response when arguing/disagreeing a point made by someone else or when questioning what someone else is doing.
    Can be a friendly and fun response or aggressive and confrontational depending on how it is used. Often pronounced Larf (not laugh) when used in jest.

    Eg. Person 1 - "Xxx is the best footballer who ever played the game."

    Person 2 - "you having a laugh (larf)? Xxx was nowhere near as good as Yyy!"
     
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  7. Gav1967 Tend not to fret too much Aug 7, 2023

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    Replies crossed in the ether
     
  8. DrmexicoII Aug 7, 2023

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    Often used in jest with the cockney rhyming slang versions (these are probably not correct cockney rhyming slang, I don't know as I'm not a cockney) -

    You're having a bubble bath
    You're having a giraffe

    Still used in my friendship circles occasionally. Usually with an "only fools and horses" accent.

    Now I've committed this to print I'm wondering whether I need new friends...
     
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  9. Omegafanman Aug 7, 2023

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  10. STANDY schizophrenic pizza orderer and watch collector Aug 7, 2023

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    As a Aussie I used that only a few days ago….was inspecting some work that was supposed to be done and it was obvious that it wasn’t.
    “You having a laugh booking a inspection”
     
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  11. Fled Aug 7, 2023

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    In general we tend to use profanities a lot, in general conversation and in a friendly way, we also use the same profanities in a not so friendly manner. The trick is knowing the difference
     
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  12. Ascalon Aug 7, 2023

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    I had occassion to speak to an American tourist recently, who was interetsed in some Irish expressions, which share much of the scarcasm of ordinary English idiom.

    I tried to impart a few, but the one with which he had greatest difficulty was the famous double Irish positive, which is acutally a negative.

    When an Irish person is confronted with something which they absolutely will not do, with palpable sarcasm, they will say "I will, yeah!" — a double positive which means absolutely negative.

    If one wishes to be even more Irish about it, it can be altered to "I will, in me hole!" - yes, I will do that on the condition that it is in my arse. An outcome which, you'll agree, is highly unlikely.

    The tourist simply could not grasp the application of this retort. To so vociferously assent, and then apply such an outrageous condition seemed to him confusing and uncertain.

    This led me to abandon my efforts to illustrate the best use of the phrase: "... and there it was — gone!"

    :)
     
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  13. Fled Aug 7, 2023

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    :D
     
  14. rob#1 Aug 8, 2023

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    You havin’ a laugh?
     
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  15. MRC Aug 8, 2023

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    You might think that but......

    WARNING racist comments included
     
  16. DrmexicoII Aug 9, 2023

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  17. Pastorbottle Aug 9, 2023

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    A dead giveaway is when they rush the demolition , before any evidence can be taken, I hope the bastard gets his construction protested, opposed, delayed, vandalised and burned down by a payback arson attack.
    Yes I know that’s wishing something illegal happens. And before any self righteous prick starts whinging, I have one word…..Karma!
    I had these developer arseholes, arrogance doing whatever they want, coming in to an area stuffing it up for the locals, putting up some shonkily built, hideous eyesore and pissing off with their profits, on their way to go bugger something else up elsewhere.
    A jihad on developers and their rapacious greed! I hope they get pizzle rot and their dicks drop off!
    Destroying a pub is is destroying a sacred place!

    ::stirthepot:::D
     
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  18. rob#1 Aug 9, 2023

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    Sadly this happens all over the world - developers, etc. never seem to get prosecuted for doing it :unsure:

    They should be forced to build it back up, wonkiness and all, as has happened in some instances.
     
  19. p4ul “WATERRROOP” to 50m Wed. 9:19am

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    A smidgen of British humour with a soupçon of sarcasm.
    IMG_3299.jpeg
     
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  20. Aroxx Sets his watch Wed. 9:39am

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    I’ve been watching a lot of old Top Gear re-runs lately and something that surprised me is the liberal use of the word “cock” on television. Not sure I’ve ever heard that on TV before. I guess it’s more referring to the bird than the male organ?