Forums Latest Members

Need help with my British lingo…

  1. Omegafanman Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    4,596
    Likes
    17,287
    DrmexicoII and M'Bob like this.
  2. TimeODanaos Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    1,586
    Likes
    3,263
    Extremely disrespectful. Anyone tried it on me would take delivery of a bunch of fives. Call me old fashioned, but I am always amazed why a foreigner in any country would take the risk of using slang and getting it wrong. For example, I have seen knives pulled at the inopportune use of the word "wanker", but amongst friends it could be almost affectionate. There is no substitute for spending time in-country to get acquainted with all the nuances and undertones!
     
    Paedipod and M'Bob like this.
  3. MRC Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    3,294
    Likes
    8,263
    I wouldn't call it "extremely" unless usage where you live is different to my experience. Meaning will also vary between spoken and written. For example "Oi! You! Outside now!" has a very different meaning between spoken directly (also depending on tone of voice) and when written for example on an internet forum.
     
    M'Bob likes this.
  4. 140dave Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    1,685
    Likes
    8,640
    and see...yet another one I hadnt heard before. Kinda like a good old Knuckle Sandwich in the US.
     
    DrmexicoII, RevZMan123 and M'Bob like this.
  5. TimeODanaos Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    1,586
    Likes
    3,263
    Yep, quite right. Also possibly a generation thing - I was told it was for misbehaving dogs not people, but things change. This is all separate from
    2. Oi - Noun (vulg.) = theory and practice of white urban English "skinhead" subculture, sometimes associated with violence and white supremacism
     
  6. MRC Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    3,294
    Likes
    8,263
    I'm pretty sure that in the 1964 film A Hard Days Night by director Dick Lester and the Beatles the lads are addressed as "Oi!" by the owner of a field they are running, jumping and standing still in. That particular "Oi!" was the voice of authority. At the end of the film a helicopter lands in the field to transport them to their next gig but it doesn't get Oi'd.
     
    M'Bob likes this.
  7. Omegafanman Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    4,596
    Likes
    17,287
    I think OI Oi can be a bit gender specific…. and the intonation makes a big difference.
    An Oi Oi saveloy from the artist Adele for example (considered I think to have a lower / working class background like myself) would be seen as positive. Oi from a male would be much more dependent on the context and intonation. A double Oi Oi is probably more likely to be friendly or at least not overtly confrontational, but depends on the context…..
     
  8. Archer Omega Qualified Watchmaker Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    26,596
    Likes
    66,018
    Context always matters...like when you say "hey buddy"...

    AA125UXg.jpg
     
    DrmexicoII, MRC, M'Bob and 3 others like this.
  9. Pastorbottle Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    1,335
    Likes
    2,473
    Often heard yelled out at international sporting events :
    “AUSSIE AUSSIE AUSSIE…OI OI OI” this cry in used by Aussie supporters to cheer their fellow Aussies on as they compete.
    No offence is meant or should be taken…..indeed anyone offering a bunch of fives, in response to this will probably win an ambulance ride for their trouble
     
    M'Bob and TimeODanaos like this.
  10. Davidt Apr 3, 2023

    Posts
    10,532
    Likes
    18,326
    “Oi” is a funny one. Numerous potential meanings but more often than not, a single “oi” is likely to mean something along a the lines of a semi accusatory and possibly confrontational “what are you doing?”.

    E.g. Someone leaning on your parked car.

    Obviously it can be toned down slightly if you know the person to a semi joking “Oi” E.g. you find your kid/mate with their hand in the biscuit jar.
     
    Tony C., DrmexicoII, M'Bob and 2 others like this.
  11. MRC Apr 4, 2023

    Posts
    3,294
    Likes
    8,263
    There was quite a lot of that in the coverage of last weekend's Australian Grand Prix. Thanks for the warning.
     
  12. MRC Apr 4, 2023

    Posts
    3,294
    Likes
    8,263
    Surprisingly well accepted. If you watch the 1964 movie of My Fair Lady Eliza Dolittle shouts something like "C'mon <horse's name> move your arse!". [So she fails the 'acceptability at Ascot races' test....] Wasn't Alfred Hitchcock still fighting the Hayes Code at the time?
     
    M'Bob likes this.
  13. DrmexicoII Apr 5, 2023

    Posts
    585
    Likes
    855
    Also, when something is completely rubbish it is a "bunch of arse". Or "a complete bunch of arse".

    Or my other favourite - "just bobbins".
     
    M'Bob likes this.
  14. MRC Aug 6, 2023

    Posts
    3,294
    Likes
    8,263
    Edited Aug 6, 2023
  15. DrmexicoII Aug 6, 2023

    Posts
    585
    Likes
    855
    Noooooo!
     
  16. Canuck Aug 6, 2023

    Posts
    13,566
    Likes
    38,385
    On a motor coach (bus, anywhere but Britain), we were in Banbury. Our driver told me, before he moved to motor coaches, he drove a lorry (truck, anywhere but England) delivering weeohs! I asked him to repeat. Weeohs, was his reply. Just then, we were passing an Aston Martin auto factory. He pointed, and said again, weeohs, you know, weeohs! Wheels!
     
    Duracuir1 and DrmexicoII like this.
  17. Aroxx Sets his watch Aug 6, 2023

    Posts
    2,672
    Likes
    11,368
    I've thought of this thread a couple times since it went dormant. A true treasure of OF. I'm glad it has been revived.
     
    Mark020, Tony C., M'Bob and 1 other person like this.
  18. Peemacgee Purrrr-veyor of luxury cat box loungers Aug 6, 2023

    Posts
    5,205
    Likes
    7,986
    I know it wasn’t he purpose of yo anecdote @Canuck but For clarity, we Brits do use the word bus but it is generally when referring to public transport (I.e. adhoc fair paying trips on demand)

    A Coach ( the term motor coach probably went out of common use in the 70s) generally refers to a higher grade of ‘bus’ for longer distances and one that is chartered ( for coach-trips) or paid for in advance.
     
    Engee likes this.
  19. DrmexicoII Aug 6, 2023

    Posts
    585
    Likes
    855
    Also tend to be a different style. A bus would have a very low floor (whether single or double decker) to enable frequent passenger entry / exit. A coach always has stairs after you get in the door and passengers sit higher up. Most coaches are single decker too.
     
  20. STANDY schizophrenic pizza orderer and watch collector Aug 6, 2023

    Posts
    16,415
    Likes
    45,168
    And then there is
    Aussie Aussie Aussie
    Oi Oi Oi

    Funny as I was at work a year back and a high ranking Marine military officer was just about to walk into a spot where he would get hit with a pressure washer spray and I said loudly “Oi” - the looks from the entourage :eek:.…… :D:D he turned and smiled :thumbsup:
     
    DrmexicoII likes this.