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  1. 17SGS

    17SGS Aug 13, 2019

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    Wow, lots of great bikes here (wasn't expecting that on a watch forum). I guess many (like me) are fans of all things mechanical. Have had many over the years, but here is the current. Harley's (like watches) are Legos for adults. This one is a clean slate at the moment, but not for long.
     
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    blufinz52 and jwvargas like this.
  2. jimdgreat1

    jimdgreat1 Aug 13, 2019

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    Added a 3rd motorcycle yesterday. 89 KZ1000P CHiPs bike with the original emblems.

    20190812_192104.jpg
     
  3. Lurk41

    Lurk41 Aug 13, 2019

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    I am also starting motorbike - only 2 lessons taken to prepare the licence for now - and I was told by people selling motorcycle gear basically the same things than here about "exotic" bikes (small series, not even necessarily sport bikes)
    Recent BMW also have some issues, but less than Ducati or KTM (Ducati improved a bit since VAG bought it but it kept its italian spirit, good and bad points).
    One expection is Triumph. They are as reliable as the Japanese bikes

    I wanted to start on a KTM Duke 390, but after what I was told I am not so sure anymore... I am still looking. In any case it won't be too powerful (plus I am obliged by law for my 2 first year of riding), and recent, with ABS. The Triumph Street Cup seems great but I am pretty sure I will scratch the paint of my first motorbike... I do not feel like damaging a 10k bike in my rookie year.

    Another advice I had was - if I have to choose - to spend a bit more on the stuff than on the bike. You can always resell the bike when you want to change or if you are not happy with it. If you are not comfortable with your gloves or worse, your helmet, then basically you can only throw it away (keep them for the unexpected passenger :p) and buy new stuff.
     
    staristheanswer likes this.
  4. MRC

    MRC Aug 13, 2019

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    Scratching the paint is just a low speed "wrong foot down" moment. Old 'bike, new 'bike -- makes no difference, you'll do it. You worry less after the first scratch.

    Better than cleaning the remains of a pheasant out of the radiator, and replacing the shattered bodywork. I saw my photos of that last week, now where did I put them?
     
  5. Lurk41

    Lurk41 Aug 14, 2019

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    That is the point: better let someone else do the first scratch :D
     
  6. Fusion

    Fusion Aug 14, 2019

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  7. Muddlerminnow

    Muddlerminnow Aug 15, 2019

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    Lots of great bikes here--some scary fast street jobs especially.

    Back in the 1970s my thing was off-roading--both trials and enduro, and getting to rivers for fishing via powerline trails. In 1973 I bought a Yankee 500--a limited production bike made for the US ISDT team (760 were made over a two-year period). The engine was an OSSA 500 twin, with both cylinders firing at the same time--it had massive torque. So hard to start it has a compression release so you don't break your right leg. It was heavy as hell--335 pounds--but had beautiful balance, especially when picking your way up a steep slope when standing on the pegs.

    It had one bad design flaw: the skid plate was attached to the exhaust system, so every time you went over rocks the shock would get transmitted up to the exhaust collars. This is what happens when a bike comes out of a short design/production schedule. Had they made them longer, I am sure this would have been sorted out.

    After I went to college, I left the bike at the home of my parents--where it sat for the next four decades. I was just visiting to clean out the house and prepare the bike to sell it--though it is tempting to keep it and restore it. Here she is (with the exhaust pulled off), down in the basement:

    IMG_5526.jpg

    In the fall of 1973 the ISDT took place on my home trails in Western Massachusetts, and I skipped school for a week to watch--it was quite a scene. The Czechs, as predicted, won--here's Petr Cemus heading into one of the river crossings:


    PetrCemus1973ISDT.jpg
    Damn, that was a fun time in my life.
     
  8. Gaz6263

    Gaz6263 Aug 15, 2019

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    Why restore it::love::? Sort out the mechanicals and ride it :thumbsup:
     
  9. Muddlerminnow

    Muddlerminnow Aug 15, 2019

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    The "mechanicals" would be folded into the restoration, primarily new seals (both for the engine and fork), new brake pads, new rear shocks. Plus, I would need to rethink the exhaust collar issue, perhaps with a section of flexi-hose. Not sure yet. Then re-safety-wire every little nut and screw. The fiberglass is all good--no worries there--though the speedo got mangled, as most Yankee speedos did--. The frame is a thing of engineering beauty --Dick Mann designed it, chromoly throughout, and built to take all kinds of shit. The fork mount was made by Smith & Wesson. Keep talking and convince me to keep it; then tell me how to convince my wife.
     
  10. Lurk41

    Lurk41 Aug 15, 2019

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    Negociate that if you keep it, you'll put a watch on sale. List it somewhere way overpriced so no one buys it. Restore the bike. Keep the watch as "no one wanted it"

    :D
     
  11. inchpincher

    inchpincher Aug 17, 2019

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    Since having a kid I’ve barely ridden my bikes but they’re still around gathering dust and will surely play a roll in the next chapter of life. Scooters were my first love, bigger bikes for touring are great but I still managed to solo my way across America on a 125cc Vespa for three months. Halcyon days.
     
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    Edited Aug 17, 2019
    Muddlerminnow likes this.