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  1. Canuck Jan 25, 2021

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    I had a rather unique watch come my way, today. The dial name is LOEHR PATENT. August von Loehr was a scientist, engineer, watchmaker, and clockmaker who was granted a patent for a self winding watch. He was active during the last quarter of the 19th century. This watch is by him. The extra two sub dials comprise one for winding reserve, and the other for seconds. I found a twin to this one that sold at auction for over $6,000 U S in 2003. I know of no way to trace the age of the watch, but it is likely circa 1880.

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    D1B76222-A8F1-42D3-BA6C-B934FD2F426E.jpeg 07B7AE39-C957-4258-9BE2-E3489D87A14A.jpeg 1E1F2848-89ED-4822-9C0B-9D31498F3B24.jpeg 337E88AF-5882-4959-B815-DCB4B6D3F75F.jpeg
     
  2. DaveK Yoda of Yodelers Jan 25, 2021

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    Maybe it’s just me, but the photos didn’t seem to load correctly :unsure:
     
  3. Canuck Jan 25, 2021

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    @DaveK,

    I forgot to edit the four pictures before I uploaded them. Should be okey dokey now.
     
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  4. High Hope Jan 25, 2021

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    I think it’s a beauty! Maybe post a photo with a quarter or other coin for scale? Also, can you see it “wind?” That looks like a sliding bumper for energy?
     
  5. Canuck Jan 25, 2021

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    Here is the watch next to a Canadian 25 cent coin for scale. In the picture of the movement, the weight that winds the watch is sort of a “T” shape. One end of the “C” shaped rebound spring for the weight is attached to the weight, and the other end of the rebound spring is secured to the movement by a screw. This type of auto wind system goes back to the18th century, and was inspired by the design of early pedometers (used by hikers). The winding actually only happens with one direction of the pendulum.

    8D19F5EA-2DA9-402A-AA3F-687F081385AA.jpeg
     
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  6. Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Jan 25, 2021

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    Lordy thats a pretty thing! Id be afraid to touch those hands! assume you are servicing?
     
    Edited Jan 25, 2021
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  7. arkman Jan 25, 2021

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    There appears to be a hallmark just under the crown. You may be able to date the watch (or at least the case) through that.
     
  8. Canuck Jan 25, 2021

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    The case is Swiss, 0.935 silver. If anyone knows how to date a Swiss age with typical Swiss stampings, please let me know. And, no, I will not be servicing it! This comes from an estate, and they want an appraisal.

    In 1880, the only stampings legally applied to silver watch cases made in Switzerland were .800 and .875. This was changed in 1887 when the .935 alloy was introduced for watch cases exported to England. The standard mark was either three small rampant bears, or one larger rampant bear, at the discretion of the importer. This case is marked 0.935, and has one rampant bear. Whether this watch was made for export to England or elsewhere, is moot, since the case has none of the typical hallmarks and date letters one usually finds on an English article, The case is marked with the Loehr trade mark. The stamping beneath the crown is a rampant bear which is a standard mark, not a date letter. So the watch might date to after 1887.
     
    Edited Jan 25, 2021
  9. arkman Jan 25, 2021

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    Unfortunately, Swiss hallmarks do not correspond to the year of assay. However, since 0.935 silver was introduced in 1888 to comply with British law, you know the case cannot be earlier than that.
     
  10. Canuck Jan 25, 2021

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    Since the case has no stampings such as one would expect on an English import, it may or may not have been made for export to England. But you’re correct. The watch could be 1887 or later.
     
  11. DaveK Yoda of Yodelers Jan 25, 2021

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    It sounds like an important piece of history. Do we know what this might have cost back in the day?
     
  12. François Pépin Jan 26, 2021

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    Very intersting watch! I do not remember having seen a wire spring like this one.
     
  13. Canuck Jan 26, 2021

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    Francois,

    The rebound spring for the pendulum is flat, as in the suspension spring for a torsion pendulum clock.
     
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  14. François Pépin Jan 26, 2021

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    I see, thank you for this correction.
     
  15. 8tung Feb 27, 2021

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    the "Perpetuale" hallmark (movement) seems to shows a Swiss & Austrian origin
     
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