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Help with value and information on 1952 Seamaster CD2767 Calibre 354 Honeycomb Dial

  1. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 15, 2019

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    Hi,

    With the passing of my grandfather six years ago I inherited an Omega Seamaster watch. At the time I didn't know too much about, other than it looked (and felt) like a nice quality watch.

    I took the watch to Fraser Hart at the Metrocentre in Gateshead and they sent it off to Swiss Time Services for a full service and restoration (to bring back to new, but maintaining orginality).

    Along with the watch after the works were done i recieved information regarding the watch:-

    1952 Omega Seamaster, CD2767, Calibre 354, Serial Number 13969472, Honeycomb Dial (off white), Double Gold batons at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'colck, single batons everywhere else.

    I have just had the watch serviced again at Omega in Switzerland, 15th February 2019.

    I have tried to find another watch the same, but have not seen anything with the same baton configuration. I have contacted both Swiss Time Services and the Guild of Valuers, and been told that they have not seen another with the same configuration.

    I contacted Somlo of London for more information and a valuation, but the cannot value as the watch was not purchased from them. They were able to tell me that in 12 years they have only had one watch the same (back when the store opened in 2007) The have told me that the honeycomb dial is not as common as the standard two tone dial, and that there were different variations of the Seamaster in the early days (not as uniform a production as now).

    I have been told that it may be worth contacting the Omega Museum for an extract regarding my watch, but I am wondering if anyone out there can help me.

    Do I have a rare model, given the dial and baton configuration? Were there many produced with the same design? What would be the value (or where should I go to) given that it is in mint condition, particularly for its age. Would it be possible to find out where the watch was purchased initially?

    Sadly I cannot ask family as there is no one alive who would know.

    The guild of valuers have provided a replacement valuation (for a modern watch as mine is no longer made - which I have yet to receive).

    I don't particularly want to sell the watch, but i would like to know as much as possible about it, and what the value would be in todays market.

    I am not the best with technology, but will try to post pictures or can email.

    Grateful for any help anyone can give.

    Darren
     
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  2. Esmarch

    Esmarch Aug 15, 2019

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  3. Tigeranteater

    Tigeranteater Aug 15, 2019

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  4. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 15, 2019

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    Sorry.....this is mine. I made a huge mistake in parting with it when suffering with poor health and deeply regretted it. Fortunately I was able to buy it back (the shop had the details of the person who bought it from them). Still suffering with health, but at that time i was VERY ill, physically and mentally.

    Yes, foolish. Yes, I got stung and lost out financially. Yes, very glad to have back in my possession.

    As per my original post, again, any information would be gratefully accepted.

    Oh, the strap the watch has now is different to that in the pictures from google. I had asked for the watch to have the original style it would have had new.

    So, again, never seen another one like it.
     
  5. efauser

    efauser I ♥ karma!!! Aug 15, 2019

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    What's in the parts bag from Omega? I think I see the crystal but there's something else in there that looks like a case back.
     
  6. Rochete

    Rochete Aug 15, 2019

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    After all those selling/buying operations you should know its "value in today markets" much better than any of us.
     
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  7. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 15, 2019

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    Thanks efauser - I'll hopefully be able to tell you tomorrow as I'll ask the jewellers who sent the watch to Omega for servicing for a copy of the service report.
     
  8. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 16, 2019

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    My mobile phone camera is not the best, but I've attached pictures of my Seamaster taken today.

    Is it a honeycomb or waffle 'textured' dial?

    I've contacted the Omega Museum and cost of an extract is 120 francs. What they have said is they cannot tell me how many watches were produced with the same dial / baton configuration.

    What i do know is model CD2767, Calibre 354, Serial Number 13969472, Year 1952.

    Is it one of the more uncommon variations?

    Fully restored (apart from Gold Capping which I was told cannot be done - correct me if that is wrong) and serviced twice. Wanted watch back to as new condition without losing the originality.

    Opinions please?
     
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  9. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 16, 2019

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    Top left where strap and case meet is reflections not scratches / marks.
     
  10. Tony C.

    Tony C. Ωf Jury member Aug 16, 2019

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    Limited value due to all of the restoration work, but also because gold-capped models are low on the desirability scale. The hour and minute hands appear to be dubious in terms of style. They would not have been completely flat like that when the watch was originally produced.
     
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  11. Biezmez

    Biezmez Aug 16, 2019

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    Hi

    As far as the recapping is concerned I’ve had a watch recapped by RePlateit.com in Canada and I was really pleased with the results.

    Regards
    Chris
     
  12. Snowman

    Snowman Aug 16, 2019

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    Here’s my 2657 Jumbo seamaster chronometer I think it tells you what members are talking about as to originality
    It’s a well held belief that omega should not be allowed anywhere near their vintage pieces

    EA00773A-E98C-43A2-BAAE-9F946708A641.png
     
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  13. padders

    padders Aug 16, 2019

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    Reading between the lines a little, I have a feeling you expect the value to be rather higher than many of us with similar pieces would estimate. A waffle dial is certainly desirable but I have a feeling that one isn't fully original (based on the fonts) and the gold capped rather than solid or steel case will hold it back. If I were forced to put a value on it, I would be in the mid hundreds ballpark. If you are laying out money on a Bienne service and professional valuations I am guessing that wont be an opinion you share but there it is, you probably spent more on the service that it would fetch on the open market. This is not the passport to riches you may think...
     
    Edited Aug 16, 2019
  14. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 16, 2019

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    As per letter from Simon Freese of STS 24th September 2013:-

    Service work entailed complete dismantling of the mechanism, ultrasonic cleaning of all movement components, replacing any worn or defective parts as necessary. The mechanism was then rebuilt, lubricated to manufacturer's specifications and elctronically timed. A new set of hands was fitted and the dial restored. The case was ultrasonically cleaned, tidied up as best as possible and fitted with a new Omega crown, glass and brown calf leather strap (new one fitted since then to match what would have had originally).

    Are you saying that STS have devalued the watch in carrying out the resoration / full service?

    As far as I am aware the second service by Omega involved internal workings only.

    Opinions again, as I asked and wanted for the watch to be brought back to as new condition (or as close as possible) without affecting the originality.
     
  15. padders

    padders Aug 16, 2019

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    Without seeing how bad the dial was originally it is difficult to say but the fact remains that a redialed gold cap fat lug SM is not massively desirable. If the dial was originally passable then yes you have removed value in messing with it, if it was junk then you have added value. All things being equal it would have been better if the dial were fully original but time and circumstance means that 60+ year old watches aren't always pretty.
     
  16. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 16, 2019

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    The dial when I originally came by the watch was not in the best of conditions - as you say, time and circumstance.

    What I wanted was to get the watch back to the best possible working condition without compromising it's authenticity / originality. I didn't want an overly restored watch that looked nothing like it did when first made. Not being an expert in these matters I put my faith / trust in STS to do this.

    Would it be worth me going back to STS and asking them to fit original hands?

    From a sentimental perspective the watch means a lot to me - as far as I know it has been in my family since new. I just wanted to get it back to original condition and working order. If this is not the case, then that is not what I asked for.
     
  17. padders

    padders Aug 16, 2019

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    STS no doubt did what they could within the instructions you gave, asking them to re-fit the hands they removed 5 years ago strikes me as a fools errand. They will have either been binned or re-purposed by now and their warranty is 2 years so they have no obligation to help. They will have fitted what Omega offer as the current replacement for this calibre and model, often on an older watch this is not exactly like for like.

    It is not overly restored and indeed might ensnare a noob, but any intervention on the dial will be detectable to a seasoned collector and collectors generally value originality over all things. Its funny you mentioned Somlo since they are more than happy to sell over-restored shiny things at hugely inflated prices to rich Mayfair types with more money than sense. If it were in their window it would probably be priced at £2K. Unfortunately in the real world (ie an Ebay or Fellows auction) considering the lug gold cap damage I think it would be lucky to make £5-600 all IMHO of course. I am probably coming across as unkind and my opinion unwelcome, that is not my intention but I wouldn't want to see you throw yet more money away if you are looking to sell this. An extract for instance wont add the £100 it costs so wont be worth it unless you want the info for sentimental reasons of course.

    If its value to you is truly in the sentimental then the monetary value is secondary. You will forgive us for being a little skeptical about this though since you have already sold it once. If the purpose of your posts is to sell it here then I think you are maybe out of luck since the dial intervention would be the kiss of death for many on here, myself included.
     
  18. autocalibre

    autocalibre Aug 16, 2019

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    Interesting, I am a newbie here, but I have a very similar Seamaster, a touch later serial number, with a black waffle dial.
    What I find interesting is this is the first vintage Omega I have seen like mine, with the the double batons at 12, single batons at 3,6, and 9 and pointers at the rest of the spots.
    Never had this one restored, been in a box since 1974 when my dad passed, except for one servicing.
     
  19. Daremm

    Daremm Aug 16, 2019

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    No, your opinion is not unwelcome - I asked.

    I didn't join the forum looking to sell. I came here trying to find out more about my watch - rare, common, value, like / dislike, etc.

    I mention Somlo as STS said they could perhaps provide me with more information regarding the watch - original, rare / common, value.

    Yes, it means a lot to me, and that is why I have spent money getting it restored and serviced - and buying it back (where I lost out alot).

    I imagine like most others on the forum money is not limitless, and I have other expenses (particularly in regards to my ongoing health issues). I want to keep my watch in the best possible condition and working order, but not where it becomes uneconomical to do so. As you will know, servicing is not cheap and at what point do you stop paying £300 / £500 / £800 for servicing if for example your watch is only worth £500?

    I have only come here to this forum for help. As i have said, all I wanted was to carefully and sympathetically restore my watch, keeping things authentic and original where possible.

    I sold it (at a time of great mental and physical stress), regretted it, and bought it back.

    If because of me putting my trust and faith in Fraser Hart, STS and Omega the originality / authenticity of my watch has been destroyed and subsequently devalued then I think I have a right to feel let down.

    I do not consider it wrong to be asking if I have something a little less common, given that i have not seen another like it.
     
  20. DaveK

    DaveK Aug 16, 2019

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    I know it is a long time ago, but sorry to hear about your father. Wonderful to have his watch as a touchstone. It is the one in your avatar? It looks sweet. Can you post a pic that shows the hands better?