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  1. Javier M

    Javier M Feb 5, 2020

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    Hi everyone, new member here! I just found this old watch that belonged to my grandfather and I wanted to know if you could help me identify the era/model. I haven't been able to take it to a watchmaker yet to have the back opened to check the serial numbers. Based on other folks I've asked, I've gotten a guess of maybe 1940s or early 1950s, but I'm not even sure if the watch is mechanical or automatic. It's a 31mm watch with 16mm lug width and about 9mm thickness including the domed crystal. I'd like to know if it's worth restoring, what should and should not be restored, and what would be a fair price for the restoration. Thank you very much for your help!!
     
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  2. Dan S

    Dan S Feb 5, 2020

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    Looks like a nice honest piece. Hand winding. Late 40s / early 50s sounds reasonable, but the movement serial number will provide a more accurate guess. Hopefully all that is needed is a full movement service. If you like the watch and plan to wear it, then it’s worth it. It’s not a financial decision. Be prepared to spend a few hundred USD in case some repairs are needed.
     
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  3. Javier M

    Javier M Feb 5, 2020

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    Thank you, Dan!
     
  4. Dan S

    Dan S Feb 5, 2020

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    And a new crystal obviously, I neglected to mention. Not a major cost.

    I suggest just leaving the dial as it is, even though there is some staining around the outside, which is quite common. Sometimes people can be successful cleaning them up a bit, but it's quite risky, and can actually make things worse. The waffle dial texture is nice.

    As I looked more closely at the photo, I noticed that the seconds hand seems short; or perhaps it's an optical illusion because of the way it is overlapping the 3 o'clock applied marker. Typically the tip of the seconds hand would extend to the outer edge of the markers, similar to the minute hand. If it is indeed short, it's possible that the tip broke off at some point or that it is a replacement. If your watchmaker happens to have a matching hand that is the right length, you could have it installed. But if it doesn't bother you, maybe you just might decide to leave it as is since the color and style match the other hands well. It's not always necessary to restore everything, especially with a family piece. After all, this is the way your grandfather wore it, and that has some historical value in and of itself.
     
    Edited Feb 5, 2020
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  5. FREDMAYCOIN

    FREDMAYCOIN Feb 5, 2020

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    Get rid of the bracelet, before it does more damage to the lugs.
     
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  6. Javier M

    Javier M Feb 7, 2020

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    I checked the seconds hand and it does indeed go all the way to the outer edge of the markers. Hopefully sometime this coming week I can take it to a watchmaker and find out more!
     
  7. Javier M

    Javier M Feb 14, 2020

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    Update! I took it to a watchmaker and got the information on it:

    Serial #: 13,638,313 -- made in 1952 according to serial number guides
    Case #: 2667 - 3SC
    Movement: caliber 420, 17 jewel manual wind movement

    The watchmaker is currently appraising the repair costs...
     
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