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Camera Bag and Tripod Recco’s

  1. Larry S

    Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Oct 2, 2019

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    After years of global travel and a succession of S series Cannons and I Phones, I decided to get back into a serious camera. Now I need a bag that doesn’t make me look like a dorky tourist. Last October in Spain, I bought a leather “Man Bag” because I was tired of carrying all my gear in my pockets and to sling my jacket through the strap. It worked with my S120 and my I Phone, however wont cut it as a camera bag. I also need a good packable tripod.

    I welcome suggestions. Ideally the bag can function as a day bag to carry, Camera, Phone, Wallet etc. Tripod should be light, packable and not too expensive.

    Many thanks!

    Here is the camera...I have a lot of reading to do...

    089B0080-58F8-48DE-B1A5-0A668E81BE55.jpeg 8966E0D9-218A-4A8A-8916-D3F5271BB844.jpeg
     
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  2. Martin_F

    Martin_F Oct 2, 2019

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    I'm using a Thinktank Backlight 26L when I'm going on trips, but that might be overkill for you.
    https://www.thinktankphoto.com/collections/backlight-series/products/backlight-26l
    Just check around their website and see if you can find something you like. I'm very happy with their quality.

    As far as tripod, I'm using an Induro GIT404XL. Again not very packable, but they make smaller ones you might want to look into.

    Oh and congrats on the camera purchase!
     
    alam likes this.
  3. Larry S

    Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Oct 2, 2019

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    Thanks .....Yup they have some nice stuff.
     
  4. JwRosenthal

    JwRosenthal Oct 2, 2019

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    I have always carried Domke. I use their larger bags for DSLR kits (Nikon D4 w/ lens, 2-3 lens, 2 SB's with brackets in the pockets, tons of cards, batteries, and other stuff- cell, water bottle, etc) and their smaller ones for Leica kits. I actually carry their "laptop" bag (which I think is now their mesenger) as my daily bag without the dividers in it. They are lightweight, rugged as hell and can withstand serious torture-plus take on a great patina with age (if that's a thing for you). They are very reasonably priced, unassuming and made in the USA.

    I also use their straps almost exclusively.
     
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  5. MCC

    MCC Oct 2, 2019

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    I bought a Manfrotto Tri Backpack this year. It works as a backpack with Ipad storage and camera case in one and comes in 3 sizes. I have the "M".
    I think it is really versatile and you don't need to take it off your back if you want access to a lens change, you can simply slip one shoulder strap off and swing the bag in front of you. I really like this feature.

    Used it on a trip to Peru and it was perfect for my needs, stored camera and a couple of lenses plus filters spare batteries etc with enough room in the top section to stuff a slightly padded waterproof. It also has a strap system to hold a tri pod on the outside of the bag although I have not used that.
     
    Larry S likes this.
  6. sxl2004

    sxl2004 Oct 2, 2019

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    I like Timbuktu messenger backs. They have camera inserts. Looks least like a camera bag.
    The insert basically transforms any messenger bag into a camera bag.
    Frost river is a very different style I enjoy.

    Best
     
    Larry S likes this.
  7. Larry S

    Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Oct 2, 2019

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    Thanks all !!!
     
  8. michael22

    michael22 Oct 2, 2019

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    Larry S likes this.
  9. watch72

    watch72 Oct 2, 2019

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    May I suggest looking into Crumpler for a nondescript camera bag. Easy access to the content and small enough for your OMD and some accessories. Unfortunately, a good tripod is not usually "packable". If you really want to bring along a tripod - have a look at Slik range. But I would recommend a monopod which is more portable and not too expensive. I have several Crumpler bags for my Nikon gears and I carry my Gitzo separately. If I need to travel light - I'll ditch the bag, Nikon and tripod and just pocket an M.
     
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  10. michael22

    michael22 Oct 3, 2019

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    What's an M?
     
  11. watch72

    watch72 Oct 3, 2019

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    Sorry, what I meant was the Leica M rangefinder.
     
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  12. S.H.

    S.H. Oct 3, 2019

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    A light, packable, inexpensive and usable (not flimsy) tripod does not exist. I have a light carbon Gitzo with an Arca ball head that is barely packable (in a big backback) and not inexpensive, I can use a Hasselblad on it but not a big gun (a heavy long lens). It would be adequate for your gear. Any serious tripod for a long lens would be heavy by definition anyway.

    The monopod suggestion is a good one imho.
     
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  13. JwRosenthal

    JwRosenthal Oct 3, 2019

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    I used a monopod for years back when I did wedding photography- had to be able to shoot and run. Was able to hand hold a Leica on the monopod in a dark church at 1 second and get razor sharp with it. As long as you don't plan to do night time exposures or architectural work with PC lenses (which you can actually hand-hold and use internal levels in daylight)- a monopod will serve about 90% of your needs.
     
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  14. Larry S

    Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Oct 3, 2019

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    This is why I love OF. Thanks for the suggestions guys!
     
  15. mayankyadav

    mayankyadav Oct 3, 2019

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    Manfrotto makes really sturdy tripods. I have one and it has done well over the past 5 years.

    If you want a camera bag that can carry your tripod then I think only way is to get a bag that has some straps outside in which you can tie your tripod ( I am using one Amazon basics bag that is perfect for what it does). It all will add to the weight however,as your tripod has to be sturdy and strong enough to withstand wind etc ( if tripod falls you risk breaking your camera or lens so you cant basically compromise with the tripod there)

    https://www.manfrotto.com/us-en/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIiM3v5JyA5QIVTr7ACh0GQAlfEAAYASAAEgKrofD_BwE
     
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  16. pnwyankee

    pnwyankee Oct 3, 2019

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    Once you decide on your tripod or monopod, you have to decide on how you will affix your camera body to your rig?
    Plates for the camera? Ball head for the tripod?
    FWIW, Really Right Stuff ( RRS ) in California is a great place to start looking for these items
     
  17. pnwyankee

    pnwyankee Oct 3, 2019

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    Carbon Fiber is absolutely the way to go for a tripod that is both stable and ( relatively ) lightweight
    Good CF tripods get very pricey, BUT, there is no reason to not look for a good used one vs buying new
    Unlike cameras and lenses, a few cosmetic scratches make no difference in performance and having one that is already less than pristine makes your tripod much easier to transport without undue anxiety
     
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  18. JwRosenthal

    JwRosenthal Oct 3, 2019

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    I agree with this on tripods made of aluminum (I have 4 Aluminum Gitzo's ranging the Super Studex Giant to the baby reporters), and carbon fiber by its nature will get thready over time like fiberglass. Older carbon fiber tripods that have been beaten around or scraped will start to shed fine shards of fibers into your hands and those hurt like a mother.
     
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  19. pnwyankee

    pnwyankee Oct 3, 2019

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    Wow, I never had one get to that point of deterioration. Wedding photography is a bear! Good to know
     
  20. JwRosenthal

    JwRosenthal Oct 3, 2019

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    That’s actually from derelict architectural work and backwoods hiking. I tired the CF for a couple years and ended up going back to my aluminum tripods. I prefer a tripod heavier than my camera rig as it balances the weight better since as mentioned above, a stiff wind will pick up a camera pretty fast.
    Monopod also works as a hiking stick btw, and a great weapon if your confronted by hooligans.
     
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