Forums Latest Auctions Members

Advice please - is this original/redialed?

  1. tbarrows112

    tbarrows112 Jun 30, 2020 8:17am

    Posts
    9
    Likes
    1
    Hi all

    I'm considering purchasing the below watch and I'd just like to see what people thought of it from an advice and collectable perspective. I'm not a massive collector and would be buying it to simply enjoy it, but it would be nice to know if it's at least a somewhat respected movement/piece.

    It's a 613 movement, Omega Geneve, and the gentleman isn't a watch expert so doesn't know how to remove the back. It looks to be in very good condition, but I'm a little apprehensive that it might be in such good condition because it's been redialed?

    Any general advice would be greatly appreciated as I'm not a collector.
     
    s-l1600 (5).jpg s-l1600 (6).jpg s-l1600 (7).jpg
  2. Dan S

    Dan S Jun 30, 2020 8:22am

    Posts
    7,130
    Likes
    16,260
    At first glance, I think it looks like a nice and appealing example of an entry-level reference. Very attractive lume and a reasonably good case. The dial appears to be original to me, please note that there is some very minor spotting, and some minor water damage at the edge near the crown. Overall, it's worth buying at the right price if it appeals to you.
     
  3. MtV

    MtV Jun 30, 2020 8:58am

    Posts
    99
    Likes
    161
    Generally, those entry-level Genèves are definitely „safer“ to buy than for example more sought-after models like black dial pie pans, at least it’s my impression that there aren’t that many redials around.

    Similar examples without the water damage aren’t too hard to find, though, so if the damage isn’t reflected in the price you might want to be patient. I’ve bought and sold manually wound Genèves with this case form and light sunburst dials in very good condition for around ~400USD/~350EUR, just to give you a very rough idea. With the water damage I’d expect the price to be below that.

    Definitely an appealing, classic design. :)
     
  4. Vitezi

    Vitezi Jun 30, 2020 9:04am

    Posts
    2,371
    Likes
    8,434
    If you plan to wear the watch, don't forget to factor in the cost of a service by a watchmaker familiar with vintage watches. The watchmaker will disassemble the watch, inspect the mechanical movement for wear and tear, clean and lubricate the moving bits, replace seals and reassemble the watch, and adjust the timing. Then you'll have a fine and accurate timepiece you can wear for years.
     
  5. tbarrows112

    tbarrows112 Jun 30, 2020 9:45am

    Posts
    9
    Likes
    1
    Thank you everyone for your help - I hadn't noticed the water damage to the right, so I'll try get a little off to reflect that.

    Thanks again, much appreciated. Hopefully this post will help others identify thing's to look out for.