Forums Latest Auctions Members
  1. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
    Hi All,

    I'm new to the forum so thanks for the add and the huge amount I've already learnt from you.

    I recently bought a Dennison Omega 267 from eBay with very little research (my mistake). I only paid £150 for it so I don't think I've been too badly screwed but I'd like some advice about where to go next.

    So here's what I've already established:

    1. The case is a genuine matching set - the number on the back plate matches with the back of the lug and the back of the bezel. The serial number puts it as a 1960 movement. The Dennison case number is 13332.

    2. The movement is genuine and as far as I'm aware correct for the watch. It runs but is very fast so needs a service (likely a kink in the balance spring or old oil I think).

    3. I'm not sure whether the dial is original or a redial but it's not in great condition either way.

    4. The hands may or may not be original, not sure. I've found a few examples wit the same hands but most I find have heavier dagger hands.

    5. The crown is not original.

    The plexilglass crystal was scratched to death so I removed it and polished it, and its come up quite nicely.

    The advice I need is whether the dial is original and the hands are the correct ones.

    If its a redial I may consider having the dial done again. If its original I may leave it as is.

    Ill be using it as a daily wearer so not too bothered about a redial if it is.

    Thanks for any help you can give me.
    IMG_0794.jpg IMG_0796.jpg IMG_0799.jpg IMG_0800.jpg IMG_0801.jpg IMG_0806.jpg IMG_0808.jpg IMG_0810.jpg IMG_0811.jpg
     
  2. Spruce

    Spruce Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    764
    Likes
    5,644
    We all take the occasional plunge into the bay but luckily, with this watch, you don’t see it as an expensive experience.

    It will cost you far more to service and refurbish this watch than you have paid for it. And were you to spend all that that would cost, you'd be left with a tired old redialled watch worth much less than you’d have spent.

    Your best option is to return it to the seller and get a refund.

    The second option would be to sell it as 'spares or repair'.

    And then look again a lot more carefully.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
    Thanks for the reply. That’s pretty much what I’d established myself. I think I’ll probably keep it though and just wear it. I’ve spent more on crappy quartz watches in the past so I think it’s still an ok deal to honest.

    Do you think it’s already been redialled at some point?
     
  4. new_heuer

    new_heuer Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    255
    Likes
    153
    I would suggest selling it and buying something that need a lot less work. You will spend more than it’s worth making it right. On the plus side I would have thought you will easily get your money’s back.
     
  5. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
    Thanks for the advice. If I were to sell it, I wouldn’t know whether to advise that it was a redial or not. Any ideas?
     
  6. Dan S

    Dan S Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    3,476
    Likes
    9,260
    If you find the dial attractive, perhaps just have it serviced and wear it as it is. I wouldn't invest time and money into any sort of restoration. If you can't tolerate the dial as it is, it would be best to resell it without paying for a service.

    If you're not an expert about Omega dials, I don't think it's your responsibility to say that the dial is original or a re-dial. Just say that this is how the watch was when you purchased it and that you are not an expert. That is honest. Given the rough condition of this particular dial, it really doesn't matter very much whether or not it was refinished in the past (in terms of value, I mean).
     
  7. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
    Thanks for the advice. I’ll consider what to do next. I understand what you’re saying about the dial. I quite like the rough look but I think over time it will begin to grate so it may be that selling is the best option.
     
  8. hoipolloi

    hoipolloi Vintage Omega Connoisseur Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    2,538
    Likes
    2,761
    Dial is original but in bad shape, hands are correct, crown can be changed to case color but need not a logo on it.
     
    wsfarrell, Matt81 and airansun like this.
  9. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
    Thanks for the info. So the crown wouldn’t have been a signed one originally?
     
  10. Rochete

    Rochete Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    463
    Likes
    838
    If you sell separately case, hands and movement you'd get more than you paid for it. Using as a daily wearer without servicing first would not be wise, but a service will cost more than you paid. I think it's all original, including dial.
     
  11. hoipolloi

    hoipolloi Vintage Omega Connoisseur Feb 10, 2019

    Posts
    2,538
    Likes
    2,761
  12. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 11, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
  13. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 11, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
    Thanks for the info.
     
  14. STANDY

    STANDY schizophrenic pizza orderer and watch collector Feb 11, 2019

    Posts
    9,213
    Likes
    19,734
    I would send it to Omega for a full service. Make them work, they want to service watches by limiting the supply of parts.

    Will cost a packet but come back like a new watch.
     
  15. Matt81

    Matt81 Feb 11, 2019

    Posts
    13
    Likes
    11
    As tempting as that may be, I think I’d end up spending the same amount as a good quality original would cost and whilst I have no issue wearing a redial, I don’t want to pay through the nose for it.