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2296.80 Titanium Rose Gold Seamaster ownership

  1. rohada Jun 9, 2021

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    The primary focus of this post is to share tricks for keeping this watch looking new, but I'll sprinkle in other aspects of ownership that I've experienced along the way, as well as my general take on this classic watch.

    I posted earlier about my user experience with my Ploprof. I like the heft of the Ploprof because I always knew I was wearing it. This watch doesn’t remind you of such things as the refined timepiece that it is. As such, it has contacted door jambs on more than one occasion. It’s easy to forget you are wearing this lightweight watch.

    I was attracted to this watch by the contrast of the blue, subdued, finely crafted wave pattern of the dial framed by the rose gold bezel. The rose gold accents on the dial are tastefully done, framing various hands and the subdials. The very thin rose gold outline of the subdials is exquisite. Lastly, the two rose gold actuators, crown, and He escape valve complement the use of rose gold on the bezel. The watch is very well tied together. To me, this is truly one of the most beautiful Omegas ever produced with respect to appearance, size (subject to the size of the wearer), and especially ease of aesthetic maintenance. I see very few of these out in the wild and when I do they tend to have amassed many fine, superficial scratches and scrapes here and there on the bezel and case.
    Omega rose gold face.jpg

    The bracelet is a work of art. I’m partial to the design of this bracelet. I believe it to be one of the best bracelet designs in the industry, again with the titanium and rose gold links really setting it off. I’ve always found this bracelet to be easy to wear. I have hairy arms and I don’t feel any tugging of the hair on my wrist. Against the gray matte finish, the bright rose gold stands out without being gaudy.
    Omega rose gold bracelet.jpg

    One of the most redeeming qualities about this watch is the ease of aesthetic maintenance that enables the watch to look new without sending it into a service center for polishing. A titanium pen (available on eBay and numerous other outlets) and the red polish that comes in any number of Dremel kits will allow you to keep this Omega looking new. First, the titanium pen should be used in one direction to gradually lessen and remove scratches. Be patient when setting out to brush the impacted surfaces. I mask off any area that butts up to the rose gold, so I don’t scar it. I also use a Scotch pad on the larger areas like the clasp and the bracelet, again in one direction. I probably need to address the clasp soon. I recommend using the titanium pen, in particular, over a trash receptacle or on a surface with a covering as the various fine strands that comprise the brush will break off as you are dragging it across the surface. I mention this because you don’t want such fall out getting on your clothes, carpeting, hardwood floors, or anything you are going to touch, breathe, or ingest. This is a methodical process that takes time, but the work is worth the result.

    The Dremel red polish that comes standard in various kits or can be purchased alone is wonderful for bringing the luster back the rose gold bits and pieces, especially the bezel. Used with the Dremel cloth disk, the polish will go on nicely. The hairline fissures and scratches that the bezel picks up can be virtually eliminated with this polish (I’m sure there are numerous other polishes and applicators, but the Dremel set up has worked for me, so that’s what I continue to use without incident). Run Dremel at slowest speed, which is still pretty brisk. Keep tool and pad moving back and forth. Let the pad and polish do the work. Light pressure is all that is required. Light is a relative term, so start very lightly on the surface in a small area and then wipe off with a microfiber polish rag, evaluate, and then repeat as necessary, working your way around the bezel. Once you get a feel for the amount of bright finish that is returning, then you can start to build a rhythm. Also keep in mind that the bezel has recesses for numerals and other markings that have some form of enamel (for lack of better word) in them, so you don’t want to bear down and run the risk of compromising the finish within those recesses. Now, the brightwork is actually that-bright. Mirror finish.
     
    Edited Jun 10, 2021
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  2. josiahg52 Jun 13, 2021

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    This is the watch that made me want an Omega. I remember the gold being more reddish but I saw it first almost 30 years ago so it could be through "rose-colored glasses" that I'm remembering it now. I ended up with a 2298.80 years later which I really like. The 2296.80 is still a good-looking watch.
     
  3. rohada Jun 13, 2021

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    Yep, this is how I got hooked. In person, there is a bit more reddish tint to the gold that tends to mute the brightness a bit. Unless something unforeseen happens, this will probably be the last of my watches to go when that time comes. Very easy to keep this watch looking new. Something I didn't realize when I bought it.
     
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  4. Mac-427 Thurs. 4:53am

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    The "preservation" techniques outlined above are very helpful and I have one more to keep the clasp nice. I ordered the same 3M paint protection film employed to protect automobile paint. In the past, I've applied it myself to my Harley and have had it professionally applied to my cars. I thought if the film would protect automotive paint from rock chips, it might also save the clasp of my 300M. The film is available on Amazon as VViViD 3M Clear Paint Protection Vinyl Film 4" x 12." I applied the film with the same methods used on vehicles after I cut it to fit the exact size of my clasp. I used an Exacto knife and made sure that there was no overlap over the edge of the clasp to avoid peeling. Next, I used a solution of alcohol and distilled water for the application. It took me a couple of tries to get the size right, but I'm happy with the results. My last application has lasted over three months. As the photo illustrates, the application is not perfect but it works quite well considering the clasp is the area on the watch that takes the most abuse.
     
    3M.jpg Seamaster.jpg
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