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  1. wwhntr

    wwhntr Sep 26, 2013

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    IMG_0789.JPG IMG_0790.JPG I've only seen a few of the Jaeger LeCoultre Geomatic. Finally was able to pick one up last month. Case wears/looks larger than 36mm due to having large dial and practically no bezel. The factory original JLC 23-jewel caliber K881G chronometer with autowind movement is adjusted to 5 positions & temperature. These movements received a COSC rating for "especially good results" after 360 hours (15 days) of rigorous testing.
    Fast-beat - 19,800 vibrations/h,
    calendar with instantaneous date change at midnight,
    direct drive seconds with
    "hack" seconds stopping device for synchronizing watch to the second.
    Kif shock protection.
    According to LeCoultre archives only 1700 of these were made from early 60's to late 60's. LeCoultre made very few chronometre grade movements, while Rolex and Omega made over 100,000 during this period.
     
  2. Patrick Dixon

    Patrick Dixon How do these messages get here? Sep 26, 2013

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    I'm not sure I could afford it, but Dibs!
     
  3. ulackfocus

    ulackfocus Sep 26, 2013

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    That's one of the JLC's on my list. Nice one!
     
  4. Joe K.

    Joe K. Curious about this text thingy below his avatar Sep 26, 2013

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    One of my favorite brands! Looks great. Thinking I should also post some non-Omega content....:)
     
  5. Privateday7

    Privateday7 quotes Miss Universe Sep 26, 2013

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    Cool JLC ..........
     
  6. gatorcpa

    gatorcpa ΩF InvestiGator Staff Member Sep 26, 2013

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    Quite true. I would say that most JLC movements of this era were of chronometer grade, but they just were not certified as such.

    JLC's own inhouse testing was at least as rigourous, if not moreso, than COSC's. Still is.
    gatorcpa

    PS - Very nice example of the Geomatic! ::love::
     
  7. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Sep 27, 2013

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    I had no idea that JLC caseback went back that far
     
  8. watchyouwant

    watchyouwant ΩF Clairvoyant Sep 27, 2013

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    yes,yes.......please do ! kind regards. achim
     
  9. tomvox1

    tomvox1 Sep 27, 2013

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    +1 with the slight addendum that most JLC movements of this era could easily be adjusted/modified to chronometer grade. Let's not forget that JLC were supplying many ebauches to Vacheron and Audemars, to name a few, and most times those movements achieved the Genevan seal after some tweaking (sometimes the addition of better balance) and occasionally those were submitted to be certified chronometers. It's just that usually JLC did not do a lot to finish the majority of their in house movements--no Geneva waves, rhodium plating, etc--and usually did not do adjustments when they were putting the movements in their own watches. The Geomatics are special because there JLC really was trying to make a horological statement under their own banner.

    Very special watch is excellent condition--big congrats! :thumbsup:
    Best,
    T.
     
  10. gatorcpa

    gatorcpa ΩF InvestiGator Staff Member Sep 27, 2013

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    I partially disagree. Watches made by JLC with the "Jaeger-LeCoutre" brand on these were adjusted by them before sale based on JLC's own standards. Raw movements marked for LeCoultre and sent to Longines-Wittnauer for casing in the USA were not adjusted by JLC prior to importation. Hence the word "Unadjusted" was engraved on the movement to meet US customs rules. Those movements were later adjusted in the US in the Longines offices before sale:

    [​IMG]

    Movements made by JLC for other houses (Cartier, V&C, etc.) were adjusted by those companies to their own standards.

    You can see very high quality photography of the differences here:

    http://ninanet.net/watches/others12/Mediums/mjlc125.html

    I don't think that COSC standards were the "be all end all" of the watch industry at the time, but it was then and still is good marketing. And they had pretty certificates with the timing statistics that generally came with the watches marked as "Officially Certified".
    gatorcpa
     
  11. tomvox1

    tomvox1 Sep 27, 2013

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    Of course I agree with you on all points and my apologies for my imprecise language. It is reasonable to assume that most high grade movement producers performed some sort of adjustment (2 positions minimum?) prior to being cased. I only meant that before the Geophysic/Geomatic-era, one doesn't see much if any "Adjusted" nomenclature on JLC-cased movements, whereas, as your link perfectly shows, the VC's bridges are covered with them, as well as a fancier level of finishing.

    Also totally agree about COSC standards: to me, it seems a game played primarily between Omega and Rolex as to which company could produce the most Certified Chronometers. The other manufacturers went to the trouble of submitting watches for certification tests only rarely. For example, there are a relatively few VC chronometers (Chronometre Royal) and vintage Patek Phillipe wristwatches with any overt "Chronometer"-related stuff printed on the dial are extraordinarily rare (see here: The "J.B. Champion Observatory Chronometer" ). Yet some people still pay good money for their vintage non-Chronometers, too... ;)
    All the best,
    Tom