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Vintage watch - Curious if you know more information

  1. NickDerp

    NickDerp Nov 27, 2017

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    Hello!

    I was given this wristwatch recently as a gift from my grandfather who got it from his father in turn. I'm curious if anyone could share some details, words of wisdom or general knowledge about it just from the dials, face and backside. I believe it was repaired once and the backside has been switched from the original. We're Swedish but I don't know if it was purchased in Sweden.

    From my google searches it appears to be of a 1940s model but I could not find one looking exactly the same.
    Turning it around it has some tiny note scribbled on its back which I would guess is something left by the watchmaker who made repairs.

    According to my grandfather the dials used to be luminescent with radium paint. I haven't checked with a Geiger counter though if it's still radioactive haha

    The watch winder used to have resistance once it was wound up completely but that stopped working a while ago which makes it very hard to wind up well and I don't want to possibly break it by overwinding it, is it fine to overwind? So I'm considering bringing it in for repairs. I find it fascinating and amazing that it still works.

    I think it says HP 5H78W-52496- on the back but the beginning could also be initials or some other meaning which I do not understand. I have not dared opening the housing/backside.

    I appreciate any info if you know anything about it.
    Not interested in selling and please forgive me for probably using the wrong terminology on watch parts.

    Best Regards!

    20171127_094613_.jpg 20171127_095144_.jpg
    20171127_095144-zoom.jpg
     
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  2. COYI

    COYI Nov 27, 2017

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    You're best to take it to a watchmaker and ask him to remove the back. Take some clear 'in focus' photographs of the movement and the inside of the caseback and I'm sure you'll get plenty of help here.
    The movement will have a serial number which will help date the watch and the inside of the caseback should have a case number which will help identify the watch.
     
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  3. JimInOz

    JimInOz "Helpful Hints from Heloise" of bracelet cleaning. Nov 27, 2017

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    Ooooo, yummy crème brûlée patina.

    Like to see more pics of the dial without the crystal.
     
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  4. ahsposo

    ahsposo Most fun screen name at ΩF Nov 27, 2017

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    Unless that is an automatic movement - and I don't think it is - no it is not OK to over wind it.

    This watch deserves a sympathetic watchmaker. Are you still located in Sweden? If so maybe some of our Swedish members like @styggpyggeno1
    can suggest a good watchmaker for you.
     
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  5. ConElPueblo

    ConElPueblo Nov 27, 2017

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    Ah, a ref. 2640! I love these 30mm Omegas :)

    It would fit perfectly if this was a Swedish-bought Omega, as these were very popular there and are still out there in force when looking at Swedish fora.

    I think yours look great - these dials tend to turn yellowy-orange just like yours. IMO, it's slightly less common to see than the ref. 2639, which has to be the most common 50's 30mm Omegas. The 2639 is the version with the sub-seconds.

    And yes, the numerals are radium-filled. A Geiger counter will show some interesting figures if held close to it :D
     
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  6. NickDerp

    NickDerp Nov 27, 2017

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    @ConElPueblo
    Thank you! After googling Omega 2640 it looks like it's the variant you say from the early 50's although with a uncommon dial.
    https://www.google.se/search?&tbm=isch&q=omega 2640

    I read that radium numerals stay irradiated even though the paint is not luminescent any more and when opening one which has remain closed you should be careful not to accidentally inhale loose paint dust. (Radium-226 has a half-life of 1600 years, gulp) Interesting stuff :D

    @ahsposo
    If by automatic you mean self winding, nah it's not. I better let it be then so I don't damage it. After some more searching I assume the dents on the backside means it requires a 3 prong watch case opener in order to remove the backside properly. So in order to figure out the exact model and photograph it I would need to find a watch repairer anyway.

    If anyone can recommend some good vintage watch repairers in southern Sweden, Skåne familiar with this model I would appreciate it!

    Thank you everyone who responded for your input and advice.
    Best Regards
     
    Edited Nov 27, 2017
  7. ConElPueblo

    ConElPueblo Nov 27, 2017

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    With respect, I wouldn't call this an uncommon dial. There is as far as I know no production numbers for the individual dial variants available, but I'd be surprised if there were any significant difference between them. It is, however, very good looking :)

    The movement type (collectively known a "30mm Omega") should be relatively easy for most watchmakers to work on. It is simple, robust and potentially very accurate. A classic watch movement, in your case a cal. 283.
     
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