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  1. Cozmopak

    Cozmopak Dec 3, 2019

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    The lume on many rolexes that I’ve seen looks shaggy around the borders and doesn’t conform tightly to the outline of the index. I’m assuming this is the result of normal degradation and that certain reference models may be more prone to it than others. But is there something more nefarious to consider such as a reluming job?

    DD373DEE-9A12-4370-9B9A-54F158AA7CFA.jpeg
     
  2. cicindela

    cicindela Steve @ ΩF Staff Member Dec 3, 2019

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    Bob, I’m going to say no for $500.
     
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  3. Cozmopak

    Cozmopak Dec 3, 2019

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    I wouldn’t touch this watch with a 10 foot pole, but are you implying that this is what a relume looks like?
     
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  4. southtexas

    southtexas Dec 3, 2019

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    That one would require better pictures and closer inspection (but based on that solo pic I vote relume). As a whole, throughout the decades factory Rolex dials have incredibly even and precise lumes relative to many other watch houses. Also, many times simple crystal distortions can give the effect of messy lume.
     
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  5. cicindela

    cicindela Steve @ ΩF Staff Member Dec 3, 2019

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    No, not at all, only that it appears possibly normal and I would not touch it. More authoritative actual Rolex experts may elucidate further so I can not really say it is or is not altered. I am sure we have someone here with experience in these to say with a degree of certainty what is going on.
     
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  6. t_swiss_t

    t_swiss_t Dec 4, 2019

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    @Cozmopak @southtexas @cicindela -- it's pretty era dependent. There are definite differences to the texture and 'precision' based on when the watch was made. Some eras are very precise, and others not so much. The late 60's, when the OPs watch is from, is a period where there were more smudged applications of lume. I can't say why but this is the first time they used the matte black dials so I assume it's because of this change.

    Here you can see a 12 o'clock marker with lume shifted to the left and a lot of shagginess on several of the other plots. Watch is of a similar era to the OPs -- 1967 ~1.7m serial 1675 with zinc sulfide lume.
    [​IMG]

    Here is a slightly later 1969 GMT with the same dial but 'waffled' lume. These tend to have more retraction (though I can't say for sure if there has been a bit off lume loss at the top of the 6 o'clock marker), though it's a tendency and not a rule:
    [​IMG]

    There are also others around that period with a distinctive 'drooping' 12 o'clock marker (1.8m serial):
    [​IMG]

    I can't say much about the OPs example without better pictures but it may just be one of the more extreme examples.
     
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  7. asrnj77

    asrnj77 Dec 7, 2019 3:15am

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    I’m not a professional by any means but I’ve found that most vintage Rolex hand sets age differently than the dials. In this example they have matching yellow lume. That plus the puffy unevenness on the dial makes me think this is a relume
     
  8. Chris75

    Chris75 Dec 7, 2019 6:45am

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    It depends: you can find genuine matching hands sets as different color relumed ones.
    Conditions and aging may change depending on watch history.
    Also depends on period: for example 90's watches as 16610 and 16570 have different colors because different type of lume were used for hands and index.
    When you see a "corn grain" Explorer 2 or a 16610 with exactly matching patina between hands and index, well that was a relume!
     
  9. Fabrice M

    Fabrice M Dec 11, 2019 9:59am

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    Don’t re lume, your watch would lose value. Most collector appreciate the imperfections.