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  1. The Father Buyer of schlock dials Oct 15, 2018

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    FE24A3D4-4784-4124-A921-9C720A22B989.jpeg 4D69536D-5F22-4761-A985-729129A88472.jpeg 8C1FCF47-6035-4BBF-8A84-D3E820CA7A0C.jpeg 939379C0-D0D8-4477-852A-E651BBC4C534.jpeg 7A5BC248-C3C9-4C6D-9FF1-A10336DCCB93.jpeg Before I use it on the Speedmaster for some scuffs, thought I better test it on some inconsequential watches
    Before and after
     
  2. gdupree Oct 15, 2018

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    daggumit did I lose my glasses again?
     
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  3. wsfarrell Oct 15, 2018

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    Photos are a little fuzzy. Polywatch is mild enough that it won't scratch hesalite or any other acrylic crystal in my experience. Polywatch will leave swirls, though (difficult to see without a loupe), best removed with Meguiar's #9 for the OCD among us:

    https://www.autogeek.net/meg9swirrem.html
     
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  4. The Father Buyer of schlock dials Oct 15, 2018

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    Makes two of us
     
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  5. Deafboy His Holiness Puer Surdus Oct 15, 2018

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    Sorry, but I can't help laughing at the pictures (in view of the context). :D
     
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  6. JamieG Oct 16, 2018

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    Did you polywatch the auto focus on the camera too? ;)
     
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  7. Bp1000 Nov 25, 2018

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    Thought I’d tag onto this

    Bizarrely I picked up 2 heselite watches this year and managed to scratch the crystal on both on the first day!!

    Anyway I’ve bought some polywatch.

    Any tips for application?

    I assume start off lightly buffing? Microfibre or lint free glass cloth?

    I assume apply more pressure if a light buff doesn’t work? I hear too much pressure can create a cloudy appearance.
     
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  8. Archer Omega Qualified Watchmaker Nov 25, 2018

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    Polywatch is really a final polish, so if the scratches are deep you need to start with something more aggressive. But not everyone is comfortable with that, so it's up to you. This is what I mean - these scratches can't be removed with just Polywatch:

    [​IMG]

    So I start out pretty aggressive on this one:

    [​IMG]

    Like any polishing, you remove the marks from the previous grit completely as you get finer...and work your way up to the final polish:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    For applying Polywatch I use a cotton ball that I keep - I apply PW to the cotton ball, and just rub it on the crystal. Once done I wipe the crystal off with a microfiber cloth and then decide if I need to polish more or not. I place the cotton ball in a plastic bag, and over time it gets enough PW I it that for light scratches I just have to putt it out of the bad and it can polish without adding more PW.

    And no, applying too much pressure will not cause a cloudy finish...

    Cheers, Al
     
  9. JanV Nov 25, 2018

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    There shouldn’t be any “in depth” procedures you need to follow other than mask the surrounding area of the chrystal good, use light pressure (moderate only on heavy scratch) and polish always in a rotating / bidirectional motion, where patience is rewarded rather than muscle. Usually for small scratches a five-ten min. session should be fine. And on really bad examples reserve at least 30 minutes for the polishing. Follow the progress also with a loupe if you have one. A micro fibre cloth does the job, but polywatch has its own cloth also.
     
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  10. Millenary Watches Nov 25, 2018

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    Hahaha! Shouldn't polywash make it "cleaner"?!?:D
     
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  11. Bp1000 Nov 25, 2018

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    Thanks guys! Really helpful advice.

    My scratches are literally minor scuff / abrasions. So perhaps I classified them wrongly as scratches.

    I’m amazed at the results on the photos posted above.

    Thanks again
     
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  12. ATWG Nov 25, 2018

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    I also use Ploly on the chrome case or bracelet to remove some of the superficial scratches, really works wonders to bring back the shine.
     
  13. Millenary Watches Nov 25, 2018

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    That's an amazing transformation! Droolworthy watch as well.:)
     
  14. Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Nov 25, 2018

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    Al ... great insight as usual. Do you use compounds or fine sand paper to build up to poly watch? I have some annoying scratches on my 69 speedy that PW just didn’t remove but I’m worrried about going too far. Thanks!
     
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  15. Archer Omega Qualified Watchmaker Nov 25, 2018

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    There are specific compounds for crystals that can be used on a buffing wheel...

    Crystal Kleer.jpg
    However there is a risk that just a second of too much time/pressure can quickly melt through a crystal using this kind of machinery, so I prefer to do it all by hand.

    I use good quality wet/dry abrasive films most of the time to start. For very deep scratches on very thick crystals, I'll start off a coarse as 400 grit and work my way up from there. It's rare to have t start that coarse though, so more often start at 600, or more often still 1500 before moving up to 2500, and then getting into the micron films. Then finish with Polywatch.

    Cheers, Al
     
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  16. Dan S Nov 25, 2018

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    For non-professional use, I have had satisfactory results using fine-grit sandpaper for the preliminary steps. Often, I can do 1500 then 2000, then Novus2/polywatch (the Novus comes in a larger container and is more cost-effective). I have also done 1000-1500-2000-polish. Most likely my results are not as great as Al's, but I find that I'm satisfied with how they look.

    Edit: I looked at my old Amazon order and found that I bought this sandpaper assortment. Currently $8.99, and it has everything you could possibly need, except for the final polishing compound.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01F6MDL7U/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1&pldnSite=1

    and here is the Novus polishing compound I mentioned:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002UD0GGS/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1&pldnSite=1
     
    Edited Nov 25, 2018
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  17. Muddlerminnow Nov 25, 2018

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    Another vote for Novus. I have used in on acrylic vitrines and Hardy Neroda fly boxes with excellent results--scaling down from 2-1 for mild scratching.

    mm
     
  18. Larry S Color Commentator for the Hyperbole. Nov 25, 2018

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    Thanks @Archer . Thanks @Dan S. I had bought the poly kit a month ago ... just ordered the Novus.
     
  19. noelekal Nov 29, 2018

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    A little valve grinding compound anyone?

    [​IMG]

    Various combinations of these do work for some crystal polishing chores. I use them by hand.

    [​IMG]

    Just yesterday I ordered some Polywatch for the first time. We'll see where it fits in among the household remedies.
     
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  20. Vitezi Nov 29, 2018

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    I use both Novus and Polywatch, and find the Polywatch works a little better. Anyone else with a head to head comparison?