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Omega Seamaster Cal. 501 ref. 2846-1SC (1956)

  1. jshaw083 Mar 8, 2019

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    Hi guys,

    Usually I shoot outside because the lighting inside my apartment is horrible. Tried using some paper to create some filters over some desk lamps I had. This is the result. Studying for my licensing exam, so I thought the backdrop would be fitting (pages from Materia Medica - 1931).

    I can't describe how beautiful this watch is with it's gold markers. Polished in just the right way to catch and play with the light. Hopefully I was able to do it justice ;)

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    Edited Mar 9, 2019
    pweingarten, sdre, nttisch23 and 3 others like this.
  2. nttisch23 Mar 14, 2019

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    Great pics! :thumbsup: What do you shoot with?
     
  3. padders Oooo subtitles! Mar 15, 2019

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    Edited Mar 15, 2019
    jshaw083 and sdre like this.
  4. jshaw083 Mar 15, 2019

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    Thank you! I Had seen the 2846-2848 on the caseback and for some reason assumed it was the latter due to the central seconds hands. Will correct my post!
     
  5. jshaw083 Mar 15, 2019

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    I use a Canon T1i Rebel, just with the standard 18-55 mm lens. Indoor shooting was using a lamp with a blank white page taped over to avoid glare. I think I likely shot it around ISO800, F5.6 with a shutter speed around 1/100. I always had trouble shooting indoors due to poor lighting. High ISO isn't the best, but it's the best I can manage for shooting indoors when it's a Canadian winter outside! (I usually shoot outside in the summer)
     
  6. jshaw083 Apr 3, 2019

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    Few more for ya! There are a few blemishes on the dial....I'm curious what people think though. If you were to look at this watch, do you think the blemishes/spots would bother you? How does it compare to Seamaster's you've own or want to buy?

    The thing I find interesting with this model is that I find the "honeycomb" pattern of the dial isn't as prominent as others I've seen. It's less easily captured on camera, and you really only clearly see it at certain angles. I haven't owned another honeycomb Seamaster so I guess it's hard for me to say for sure whether this is normal or not!

    Photo 2019-04-02, 10 35 32 PM (1).jpg Photo 2019-04-02, 10 35 32 PM.jpg

    -J.
     
  7. seekingseaquest Apr 3, 2019

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    It’s impressive that the dial is so white still, and the spots are not very noticeable. It wouldn’t bother me at all. I also really like the rail track tick marks.
     
    jshaw083 likes this.
  8. dputydwg1 Apr 3, 2019

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    great looking watch
     
    jshaw083 likes this.
  9. Diggle Apr 14, 2019

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    20181105_130148.jpg 20181105_130108.jpg
     
  10. Diggle Apr 14, 2019

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  11. S.H. Apr 14, 2019

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    Cool pictures! May I suggest you have a look at the color levels / white balance of your images? There are various ways to play with colors in digital photgraphy (on board parameters, post processing, ...). Here, there is too much red imho, probably from the lighting used. Here is a quick example after some tweaks to show how much it could change a picture:

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    Nice watch btw.
     
    jshaw083 likes this.
  12. jshaw083 Apr 14, 2019

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    Yeah definitely looks better. Still getting used to using Lightroom. I'm not used to shooting indoors, and using orange lighting from a standard lamp, so makes the post-processing harder. Thanks for the advice!
     
  13. S.H. Apr 14, 2019

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    Try some different white balance presets on your camera maybe? On some, you can take a picture of some blank white stuff, and tell the camera that it must be used to set up the white balance. Less hassle while post processing if the lighting is strange.