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  1. Simrocks

    Simrocks Apr 7, 2016

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    Good afternoon from wet and windy North Wales in the UK.

    Recently inherited 18k self winding ladies Omega wristwatch which was purchased new by my grandfather from a London jeweller in October 1973 for £930.00. The watch is in mint condition having not been worn for many years, and was last serviced 6 years ago. The model number is BA811 011 and the accompanying brochure states "From the Omega Jeux d'Or Collection. A chiselled mass of gold spilling onto the wide burnished bracelet, holds the crystal of smoky quartz. This model is imited edition." The reverse of the clasp is signed A Grima.

    The problem I have, is that the bracelet has never been adjusted and is far too big for my wife's wrist. If the bracelet is cut by a jeweller could it be corrected at a future date, and am I seriously detracting from the value if I do this?

    I would very much welcome any guidance.
    DSC02527.JPG _DSF0637.jpg
     
  2. Canuck

    Canuck Apr 7, 2016

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    Welcome,

    If you could give us a MUCH clearer picture of the stampings on the under side of the buckle end, and the TOP side of the buckle end, we might be able to advise you on the adjustment of the length. It is clear to me that you haven't spoken to a goldsmith re: adjusting the length. There is a 90% chance that this would be a job for a goldsmith to do, since karat gold watches (if that is what the subject watch is), usually involve cutting and gold soldering to adjust them. As to value? In my opinion, the value wouldn't change with having it cut to fit. If it IS in fact karat gold, KEEP the piece that is removed in case it has to be put back on at a future date. If it in NOT karat gold, the piece likely can't be put back on.
     
  3. Simrocks

    Simrocks Apr 7, 2016

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    Many thanks for the prompt reply - two further photographs attached, which are as good as I can provide with the technology at my disposal.

    Your assumption that I haven't spoken to a goldsmith is correct. I have spoken to a jeweller who offered to send it to their goldsmith, however, whilst they stated the adjustment is feasible, they could not be specific re ramifications of the adjustment to value. As regards the composition of timepiece, the original receipt, brochure, subsequent insurance and probate valuation and finally the jeweller confirmed that the case, bracelet and clasp are 18k gold.
    _DSF0638.jpg _DSF0639.jpg
     
  4. Canuck

    Canuck Apr 7, 2016

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    Thanks! Now we're getting somewhere! The .750 would indicate 18/24 gold content, or 18 karat. When the bracelet was made, the buckle components were separate components which were gold soldered onto the ends of the gold mesh. This is a job for a goldsmith. The process would depend on the goldsmith. The decision would have to be made as to how much mesh to remove, and whether to shorten it on both ends of the mesh, or all on one end. Shortening these bracelets on both ends is best in my view. The buckle components should (I feel) be unsoldered, the mesh cut, then the buckle components re-soldered. Keep the pieces! The goldsmith will likely insist the movement be removed from the case. As to value? It's likely worth more, and will be an easier watch to sell, if you keep the pieces!
     
  5. Simrocks

    Simrocks Apr 7, 2016

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    Great - thanks Canuck for the advice, much appreciated.

    Would you or any other member know how many watches would have comprised the "limited edition"? Is it likely that the circled 36 on the reverse of the clasp signifies this particular unit number in the run? I have endeavoured to search the forum (and google) but to no avail.
     
  6. Simrocks

    Simrocks Apr 7, 2016

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    Great, you have been extremely helpful - the document you attached makes very interesting reading.
     
  7. Canuck

    Canuck Apr 7, 2016

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    I have uploaded the URL to a site that gives a lot of info on Swiss precious metal quality marks. The bracelet on the watch (and possibly the case) were likely made in Italy for Omega. There are several other tiny stampings (likely comprising the decimal .750 for 18-karat, a profile of Helvetia which is the Swiss standard mark for 18-karat), and one or two others I am unable to discern. I think the 36 would likely constitute a "responsibility mark" which, in the area of Swiss precious metals marks I don't fully understand. There may be stampings on (or inside) the case back which might enable you to check with the Omega archives in an attempt to determine how many of this model were made. Perhaps someone who knows how to go about that might add a comment.
     
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  8. mac_omega

    mac_omega Apr 7, 2016

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    I think this bracelet could have been manufactured in UK

    There is a stamp "OWC" which mean Omega watch company - often used on UK watches

    The serial of tiny stamps which can not be read with this low res. picture seem to be British hallmarks... try to read them with a loupe!

    The number starting with BA 811.1011 is the Omega reference number, BA is the metal code for yellow gold.

    Hope this helps a little
     
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  9. Simrocks

    Simrocks Apr 8, 2016

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    Thanks mac_omega, I'll check the small hallmarks and report back.

    I have established that the "A Grima" (Andrew Grima) signature on the clasp was a high end Bitish jewellery designer and designed a number of pieces for Omega during the late 60's early 70's. His self produced examples are now quite valuable, this, however, is an Omega produced derivative.

    If anyone can advise further information on the timepiece (including number of units in the "limited edition" run) I would be very grateful.
     
  10. chronos

    chronos Apr 8, 2016

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    I found your watch in Richon's "A journey through time" on page 732.
    There's nothing written about being a limited edition or about how many were produced.

    20160408_110046.jpg
    Text is in German so I'll translate the most important points for you:
    - designed in 1969
    - It's a man's watch - not as you described a woman's watch, which explains the long bracelet. This is a good thing for you, as men's watches are more sought after hence they are in general more valuable than women's watches.
    - the text then is describing the watch which I think I don't need to translate.
    - 18k goldwatch with an automatic caliber 711, clasp is signed with A. Grima
    - there also exists a BA 411.015 model with an ultra flat cal. 700
    - matching cufflinks (on the right of the watch) were sold as well. (Do you also have them?)


    20160408_110121.jpg
    To the article about Andrew Grima. As I think you can read about him on the internet in your own language, I focus on some watch related points:
    - born in 1921 in Rome
    - purveyor to the British court since 1966
    - was honoured with different awards many times
    - in 1969 he created a collection for Omega which had to be modern and of a "high standard" (whatever that means...;))
    - he created one of the biggest watch-collection an artist has ever made: 55 watches and 30 matching pieces of jewellery.
    ...

    Maybe some other members with an English version of AJTT may post pics of page 732 if you need more details.

    I hope my info helped a bit :)
     
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  11. Simrocks

    Simrocks Apr 8, 2016

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    Thanks ever so much chronos for the information.

    What a surprise to find out it is a man's watch, that certainly explains the length of the bracelet. Too large for me too, and a little too ostentatious as well, so unlikely to receive a great deal of wear.

    No, I don't have the cufflinks unfortunately.

    I shall continue to research the number produced, and in the meantime have attached an extract from the 1973 Omega brochure detailing the Jeux d'Or range.

    One of those unfortunate scenarios really, in that too "bling" to wear and too much sentimental value to sell (the jeweller previously referred too stated as scrap alone it would be worth a fair sum due to the weight of the gold). _DSF0640.JPG