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  1. Passover

    Passover Jun 20, 2017

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    Hi, I need some general information: What are the characteristics / definitions of "De Ville" and "Geneve" Thank you very much
     
  2. Mouse_at_Large

    Mouse_at_Large still immune to Speedmaster attraction Jun 20, 2017

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  3. Fialetti

    Fialetti Jun 20, 2017

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    Neither term really designates a model in the way that 'Speedmaster' or 'Constellation' does. Both are (or were) generally used to designate a 'family' of watches within Omega's lineup, and the characteristics of both changed over time. The 'Geneve' line ran from 1953 to 1979 and [edit: later in its run] was usually used on Omega's entry-level watches. They are three-handed watches with, at most, a date complication, and were produced in relatively large numbers.

    'DeVille' is more varied; it was introduced in 1960. Many early Devilles are dress watches, but it was also used for a variant of Seamaster in the mid-60s; other models were chrono rated. In the early 70s the whole line was redesigned by the Jeweler Andrew Grima who added MORE GOLD and made it briefly funky in a 70s jet-set sort of way. When that concept was dropped 'Deville' seems to have become less clearly defined, but generally associated with dress watches. Currently, it serves as a catch-all for all of Omega's non-sporty watches (other than the Constellation and special editions), ranging from simple time-and-date models to their most horologically complex co-axial escapement watches.
     
    Edited Jun 20, 2017
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  4. Edward53

    Edward53 Jun 20, 2017

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    The exception to the Geneve date-complication-only rule being the Geneve Dynamic, though that's a bit of an oddity, a one-off line quite unlike other Geneves being produced at the time.
     
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  5. padders

    padders Jun 20, 2017

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    To call Geneve bottom of the range isn't really correct for pieces up until about 1967 IMO, prior to that they were of a much higher quality and sat more like just under Connie in the pecking order as a 2nd teir dress watch, sharing most of the features of the top tier. After the closing of Omega's Geneva facility, the label was used for lower priced models and seems to have been slapped on many unrelated designs such as Chronostops, hummers etc etc.
     
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  6. Tony C.

    Tony C. Ωf Jury member Jun 20, 2017

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    The above comment is on the correct track, but the early Genève model was actually the second highest in the manual-wind model line, behind only the 30T2Rg Chronometres. The Constellations were automatic watches, and so in a different category.
     
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  7. Passover

    Passover Jun 20, 2017

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    Thanks to everyone for their answers, I really appreciate