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  1. Maurizio

    Maurizio Jun 29, 2020 1:49pm

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    Hello everyone,

    this is my first post on these forums.

    I found a *truly spectacular* (to me) vintage Omega timepiece inside a drawer in my house, which probably belonged to my father or my grandfather. It looks to be working perfectly, manual winding will give it the amount of power it needs to go through a day or two and I am really happy with it.

    Now, here's my three questions:

    1) Is there any chance of damaging this particular timepiece mechanism by overwinding it? How much winding is required (or recommended) for this type of timekeeper? I read that you have to give something like 40 movements until it's fully wound, but I will ask for confirmation anyway (I know this question is asked all the time, but there's just so many people who have never owned a mechanical watch and will need some "guidance").

    2) May I know what model is it exactly, based on the picture? Unfortunately, there is nothing written on the dial nor on the caseback and I have found no pictures of similar models online.*

    3) If I were to change the strap, which I probably will have to, how may I find a "compatible" one? Suggestions?

    *The timepiece is not in pristine conditions, but even so I am afraid of prying the back open to find out more about it, even if such operation was to be performed by a skilled watch repairman. Is it necessary? In which case, can you explain how to do it and which tools are needed? Is it something I can do myself or do I have to bring it to someone more experienced?

    Thank you!
     
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  2. killer67

    killer67 Jun 29, 2020 2:06pm

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    it’s necessary to find out what it is and if a correct example
     
  3. efauser

    efauser I ♥ karma!!! Jun 29, 2020 2:51pm

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    The information you want is inside the caseback and on the movement.
     
  4. Maurizio

    Maurizio Jun 29, 2020 3:05pm

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    I know! I just wanted to know if any of you could identify the watch by looking at it and its main key elements!

    Also, I said that if necessary I might try and pry the case open, but I need information on how to do that, here's a photo of the caseback. For those of you wondering, there is no indentation or spot where it might be easier to pull. So I'm not sure how to do that.

    I'm well aware this might sound rude or pesky, but please try and answer my questions (IF you've got answers) in a more "useful" way, if you may.

    Thank you.
     
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  5. TexOmega

    TexOmega Jun 29, 2020 3:07pm

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    Good luck with that point of view towards the members here.
     
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  6. killer67

    killer67 Jun 29, 2020 3:12pm

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    Sorry to bother you with our help. As mentioned, it is necessary to open the case to determine the reference number and movement. If you know what you’re doing you can open it gently with a watch knife, otherwise I would recommend taking it to a watchmaker who can also see if you need it serviced and swap straps which is quite easy. Strap options are endless and requires a proper internet search to fond the color/style you might be looking for
     
  7. efauser

    efauser I ♥ karma!!! Jun 29, 2020 3:27pm

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    Your response is much nicer than mine was going to be.
     
  8. vbrad26

    vbrad26 Jun 29, 2020 3:45pm

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  9. Duracuir1

    Duracuir1 Jun 29, 2020 3:48pm

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    That’s a nice watch! Very special if it was already in your family!! The applied markers are beautiful. If it works for a day or two when you wind it, you’re better to just enjoy it. I love collecting watches but always leave the opening part to my jeweller. When you decide to service it have your jeweller send you a shot of the movement. The strap style actually looks quite nice just the way it is too, in my opinion.
     
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  10. MtV

    MtV Jun 29, 2020 5:05pm

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    It’s a regular strap with spring bars, you’ll still need a tool to swap it. If you want to look online for a strap you like, you’ll just have to measure it’s width where it’s attached to the watch, I’d guess it’s 18mm.
    For a watch maker, changing the strap and opening the watch is absolutely an everyday-task, unless there’s something bent or wrong with the case back it’s a matter of seconds. Just look for one in your neighborhood, go there and ask nicely. The story of the watch might also help.
     
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  11. Biezmez

    Biezmez Jun 29, 2020 5:32pm

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    Hi
    It’s a lovely heirloom to find. If it’s been lying around in a draw for many years then you should really get it serviced and especially if it’s a family heirloom that you’re going to cherish. The oils that protect the parts in the movement have most likely all dried out, so lots of usage may damage some parts of the watch. As previously advised get it to a nearby recommended watch repairer that deals with vintage watches.
    As regards the details of the watch I would guess something like a 283 cal. You can get it confirmed when it gets opened up.

    The strap width is a standard 18mm I would assume and very easy to pick up a new strap.

    Let us know how it goes.
     
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  12. Edward53

    Edward53 Jun 30, 2020 4:10am

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    It was totally unnecessary to flame the OP like that. He is neither too lazy or too stupid to open the watch himself but has explicitly stated that he doesn't want to do so for fear of damaging it. (I can understand that as I've been collecting for several years and I don't like opening watches either.) He politely asked if anyone was able to tell him what it is based solely on those pictures. He received a couple of sarcastic responses that ignored those points and then asked as politely as he could if anyone could answer the question as posed. English is probably not his first language and it's difficult to convey shades of meaning a language that's not your own. Try it on an Italian forum and see how you get on.

    @Maurizio I do not know what model your watch is but I would guess the movement is something like a 283. It is what's called a "no name" Omega, ie not a specific brand like a Seamaster or Constellation, but will still have a quality movement inside. It's a nice watch, whatever it is.

    It is possible to overwind manual watches like this and when winding them, the important thing is to do so gently until you feel resistance, then stop.
     
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  13. Biezmez

    Biezmez Jun 30, 2020 4:29am

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    .....and here’s my 283 in a 2640 case for comparison. Although your watch looks like a snap back case rather than the screw back on my 2640. The dials look very similar, just som small nuances on the numbering and the hands of course.
    Is yours a 33mm case diameter?

    1403C34E-7401-4231-BCF8-7D10CB6C141F.jpeg A9514BE6-16FD-4C5C-8655-59CEB348DE96.jpeg
     
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  14. Franzlad

    Franzlad Jul 3, 2020 10:59am

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    The case looks like a 2504 reference.
    Cheers
     
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  15. Maurizio

    Maurizio Jul 4, 2020 5:00am

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    Thank you! the strap style is fine, unfortunately I don't quite like the length of it and the pattern of the design. I am not that sure it is the original one either! No logos on it whatsoever. BUT it looks similar to the one mounted on a similar watch which I just found here thanks to the message by @Franzlad

    Thank you very much! I confirmed it's a regular strap with spring bars and the width is, as you correctly guessed, is 18mm.

    Yeah.. I feel defeated here. Thank you for your time and for your elegance in putting me to my place.. Guess I had been a little too "rough" previously. Sorry.

    Thank you for your kind words. Definitely not my first language and definitely Italian. You nailed the point I was trying to make in my second post and gave what I would describe as a "proper" answer (as many of you actually did and I'm really glad!). THAT SAID, I was probably being a tad too intolerant there. No need to trigger flame wars on the internet, there's already too many. I'll take the blame for being too rough.

    So there ARE "no name" Omegas after all. Good to know ahah, I thought mine was the only one not to go with a family name.

    Also, yes, I tried winding it very carefully as to make sure of any changes in the sound or the feel of it and it will definitely add some resistance near the end. Starting to get the hang of it. I actually thought it might be "infinite" at first. You can see how clueless I am about mechanical watches.

    Definitely some differences there, the crown is also a little different. I might tend to go for the 2504 reference here. My caliber says it's a 35mm case diameter. The dial is very very similar though! Same era, I guess? VERY nice watch though.

    Definitely looks like it! So I guess it's from the late 40s - early 50s then. Thank you!

    I might think about bringing it to a watchmaker and tell you guys who was right/wrong (ah ah, joking of course) and show you the mechanism. Will think about it. What does it mean to "service" a watch though? I mean, I guess that some maintenance is in order here, as it definitely isn't keeping the time right. That much I can say for sure, unless my phone together with all the other clocks in my house are losing two minutes per day. Unlikely.

    EDIT:
    The message above (which I had missed, very sorry for that!) answers my question about servicing. So it DOES need servicing after all. Will do! Thank you for that kind explanation!

    Also, when asking about the straps I was probably unclear. The question was more about "what is your favourite brand when it comes to watch straps?" Brands you're in love with and make high quality leather bands or have some cool locking mechanism and stuff. Would you go for an Omega one or some local leather craftsman's? or some other brand?
     
    Edited Jul 4, 2020 5:17am
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