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A Speedmaster, tea, and a guy who chops meat...

  1. M'Bob

    M'Bob Jun 13, 2019

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    So an English patient (not "the") comes into my office, notices my Speedmaster, and says,"Take a butchers at that fine kettle." Might one of you fine Brits care to elaborate?
     
  2. tyrantlizardrex

    tyrantlizardrex C is NOT for "Lizard". Jun 13, 2019

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    Butchers Hook = Look

    Kettle and Hob = Fob (watch)
     
  3. ahsposo

    ahsposo Most fun screen name at ΩF Jun 13, 2019

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    I wish they would learn how to speak English...
     
  4. Wivac

    Wivac Terribly special Jun 13, 2019

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    Why do you work in 1930?
     
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  5. STANDY

    STANDY schizophrenic pizza orderer and watch collector Jun 13, 2019

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    What you got on your Warrick Farm there.

    Would have cost a fair bit of cabbage.



    My late father was a butcher and the king of rhyming slang. Used to always love it when he said “watch your onka,s” when I was a kid working with him in he’s butcher shop, which was Onkaparinga,s = finger
    9C2A76EA-CC63-43DE-A548-09F426480081.jpeg
    Or
    warning I would get a clip over the “ginger beers” = ears

    But the dead horse on the dogs eye, was the woollen vest.
     
    Edited Jun 14, 2019
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  6. oddboy

    oddboy Zero to Grail+2998 In Six Months Jun 14, 2019

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    Love the rhyming slang...

     
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  7. jsducote

    jsducote Jun 14, 2019

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    I find it hard to believe that any two people can speak rhyming slang and understand each other. I've only ever seen one person say something and then have to translate/explain it to the other.
     
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  8. Davidt

    Davidt Jun 14, 2019

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    Do you live in London/the UK?

    If not its perfectly understandable that you find it hard to believe but some of the phrases are second nature to many Brits.

    I grew up hearing/saying "up the apples and pears", "what a berk", "get the dog and bone", "fancy a ruby", "lets have a butchers at that" etc and I'm from Yorkshire (although my Nan was born within the sound of the Bow Bells).
     
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  9. M'Bob

    M'Bob Jun 14, 2019

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    I was wondering how this was used, because the fellow later explained that, the way he knew it was that only the first word in the word pairing is spoken. For instance, since stairs is "apples and pears," one would say,"Now don't fall down the apples luv."
     
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  10. Davidt

    Davidt Jun 14, 2019

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    It’s possible I use a Yorkshire-Cockney bastardisation.

    For instance I’d say Dog and Bone (phone), apples and pears (stairs), but then only Ruby (curry) or butchers (look).
     
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  11. Mad Dog

    Mad Dog Married to MacGyverette! Jun 14, 2019

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    Good thread! :thumbsup:

    I’ve always enjoyed (and have frequently used) pilot words...my favorite example is as follows:

    “It’s like a sore dick...you can’t beat it!”

    The pilot words above are used to describe anything that is freaking fantastic.

    LATE ENTRY: Some pilot words are NOT RECOMMENDED for use during church.
     
    Edited Jun 17, 2019
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  12. Davidt

    Davidt Jun 14, 2019

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    Berk is the best one.

    I learnt it from my aunty when I was about 5. I always assumed it was a random, slightly fun way to describe an idiot. Kind of like plonker - a bit fun and not really mean.

    I learnt about 2 decades later it’s rhyming slang using Berkeley Hunt (I’ll let you decide what Hunt rhymes with) .
     
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  13. madjestikmoose

    madjestikmoose Jun 14, 2019

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    Cockney rhyming slang... it's an art form in itself.

    Now then, I'm from Bristol, south-west UK... ten points if you can correctly identify what a 'jasper' is otherwise known as in these parts - and NO GOOGLING.
     
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  14. The Father

    The Father Jun 14, 2019

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    jasper = igit
     
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  15. madjestikmoose

    madjestikmoose Jun 14, 2019

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    Nope...
     
  16. Mad Dog

    Mad Dog Married to MacGyverette! Jun 14, 2019

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    A ‘ho’?

    As in a ‘ho bag’?
     
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  17. madjestikmoose

    madjestikmoose Jun 14, 2019

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    Nope! OK a bit of a (phonetic) clue... "Watch out fer they jaspers!"
     
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  18. The Father

    The Father Jun 14, 2019

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    Maybe it should, sounds pretty good to me.

    "What air ya doin, ya Jasper!"
     
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  19. Mad Dog

    Mad Dog Married to MacGyverette! Jun 14, 2019

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    A sore dick?
     
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  20. madjestikmoose

    madjestikmoose Jun 14, 2019

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    Even more irritating than that.
     
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