Forums Latest Auctions Members
  1. 2002Seamaster

    2002Seamaster Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    3
    Likes
    0
    Greetings!
    This is my first post so thanks for having me on the forum. I have a 2002 titanium Seamaster that I bought new. 3 years ago it started running fast all of a sudden. It gained approximately 45 minutes in a span of 24hours. I sent it in to be repaired and it worked great. $400. Last week it did the same thing only worse. This time it gained 85 minutes in a span of 24 hours. I imagine I'm looking at another $400. Any idea what is happening? One thing I can say is this time the watch has been used during the weekend only. I was using a dress watch during the week so the Omega would completely wind down and stop. But, it has been going through that cycle for a couple of years now with no previous problems. Any ideas?
    Cheers!
    John
     
  2. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    18,584
    Likes
    14,939
    Where abouts are you located? Also is it a chronograph or just a time only watch?
     
  3. 2002Seamaster

    2002Seamaster Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    3
    Likes
    0
    I'm in Northern California. The watch displays the date only - besides time of course. I have it on the Omega rubber watch band using the old stainless expandable deployant clasp. I wish other watchmakers would produce this type of clasp. It's so easy to change for temperature!
    Cheers!
    John
     
  4. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    18,584
    Likes
    14,939
    Is it possible that it could have been exposed to a magnetic field at all?

    BTW you can use an independent easily for these as long as he's good, if its a de-mag job it costs nearly nothing, but even a full service is relatively cheap, Calibre 1120 is a very straightforward movement to work on.
     
  5. 2002Seamaster

    2002Seamaster Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    3
    Likes
    0
    Oh man yes, take your pick. I had cancer in 2011 and had to go through the radiation/chemo fun. That's all done and I'm clear. Woohoo! But periodically I have to get PET scans which are like long term MRI's. Just had one about three weeks ago. My watch wasn't on, but it was in the same room. Also, I'm a power systems engineer and I work on large diesel generator sets - 12kV. Alternators are nothing more than a rotating magnetic field. I'm always crawling around them, running or not.
    On the other hand, the morning it started happening the watch had not been exposed to a high field immediately prior. Is there a cumulative effect?
    Assuming it's a magnetization problem what do I ask for when dealing with a repair facility? Degaussing?
    Cheers!
    John
     
  6. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    18,584
    Likes
    14,939
    Pretty much, yea, its a fairly common thing. Also you know there are watches like the Omega Railmaster, Rolex Milgauss, and now the new Omega Anti-Mag Aqua Terra that are made to resist (or in the case of the anti-mag, ignore) magnetic fields.

    Railmasters and Milgausses use a soft iron faraday cage to shield from magnetic fields up to fairly high ranges and were developed for scientists and power plant engineers. The Anti-Mag uses completely amagnetic materials and doesn't even need shielding.

    Because you have a titanium watch, I'd imagine it'd be even more susceptible than a steel one. And yea the degaussing procedure is fairly cheap and straight forward.

    I'm not saying its definitely that, but it would certainly explain a lot given the circumstances and symptoms.
     
  7. N2FHL

    N2FHL Omega Qualified Watchmaker Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    28
    Likes
    27
    Sounds like its magnetized, but its easily cured. Every watchmaker should have a demagnetizer so your local one should be able to do it for you quickly. More importantly you need to figure out how you're magnetizing it. Here's the write-up they send you: (Note that when reading the numbers only the German -speaking Swiss use apostrophes instead of commas.)

    "What is Magnetism?

    Exposure to a magnetic field may cause your watch to be magnetized and may lead to excessive rate gain which will cause your watch to run either very fast, slow or stop entirely. It is important to understand that no permanent mechanical damage will result from this exposure and it is possible to demagnetize the watch in moments with a specialized tool called a demagnetizer. Please kindly take note that neither the quality of the watch, nor any mechanical defect in its movement can be considered the cause of magnetization, as it is a phenomenon that is external to and completely independent of the watch.

    Our mechanical watches are tested according to the ISO 764 norm which stipulates that the watches should resist magnetic fields up to 4'800 A/m (Ampere/meter is the unit of intensity of magnetic fields) at the most, and to be completely precise although very technical, the value of the residual average timing (that means, when a watch is not submitted to this field of 4'800 A/m) should not exceed 30 seconds per day for a gents watch and 45 seconds for a ladies watch. Our watches respect this norm which defines a standard adopted by the entire horological industry.

    Here are a few examples of common goods that emit magnetic fields and their magnetic strength (at close contact), to be compared with the maximum resistance of 4'800 A/m considered as the norm for watches:

    - Mobile phone speaker = 22'400 A/m
    - Electric shavers = 10’400 A/m
    - Magnetic furniture latches = 64'000 A/m
    - Positional magnets = 144'000 A/m
    - Laptop & PC speakers = 16'000 A/m
    - TV set = 800 A/m

    Other sources are computer hard drives, medical equipment, refrigerator doors, magnetic catches on handbags, etc. Unfortunately, we do not possess data with regards to professional equipment and the strength of the magnetic field they emit.

    The phenomenon of magnetization is taking place more frequently around the world, and especially in the last ten years due to the steep increase of objects and equipment emitting magnetic fields that are used in our daily lives. If you are a frequent international traveler your watch can also be exposed to strong magnetic fields at an airport security checkpoint, when you walk through the metal detector frame that has been set at very high intensities. In order to avoid such an exposure, we recommend taking off the watch and adding it to the personal belongings and carry-on luggage going through the luggage screening equipment, because these machines use X-rays that have no influence on a timepiece.

    Another solution is to use a commercial demagnetizer when the watch starts to function erratically or ask your Authorized Dealer to demagnetize the watch with their equipment. When using a demagnetizer the watch is easily demagnetized in a few of seconds as long as the instructions for use are respected.

    We would like to point out, however, that you still should investigate which equipment(s) or object(s) in your professional or private environment that is causing the magnetization of your watch, in view of avoiding exposure of your timepiece to those magnetic fields in the future."
     
    Stewart H, John R Smith and UncleBuck like this.
  8. UncleBuck

    UncleBuck understands the decision making hierarchy Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    2,553
    Likes
    4,835
    Hey Steve, Great to hear from you and good advice. I have a bumper that was shipped overseas that was spot on and now is 10 min. fast, I bet it's magnetism.
    Just a few hummers left, you seeing any?
    Jim
     
  9. N2FHL

    N2FHL Omega Qualified Watchmaker Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    28
    Likes
    27
    Haven't seen one in about 3 weeks, but the rest of the forum is going to think we're talking about tuning fork watches

    Steve
     
  10. watchyouwant

    watchyouwant ΩF Clairvoyant Oct 1, 2013

    Posts
    2,001
    Likes
    2,277

    can also be a tiny spec of oil, dislocated from a pivot and caused to stick on the hairspring and "binds" 2 strands together......easy to achive during shipment with a bump along the way. kind regards. achim
     
  11. Archer

    Archer Omega Qualified Watchmaker Oct 2, 2013

    Posts
    15,484
    Likes
    31,234
    The first question I ask when someone brings me a magnetized watch is "Do you have an iPad?" There are more magnetic fields around us that ever before, and they can be in very unassuming places. The rate change you describe is likely due to the watch being exposed to a magnetic field that you are not aware of in your surroundings.

    Demagnetizing would be the first step, and as noted it's quick and easy, and normally does not even require opening the watch.

    If you find the watch is magnetized, you need to figure out where the magnetic field is that is causing you this problem.

    Cheers, Al